Career Development

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Xavier University Career Development is committed to providing services and resources that support all of our students and alumni in an equitable, inclusive manner, recognizing that not everyone has equal access to career opportunities and networks. No matter your identities, we hope that the below resources help you to feel better equipped to achieve your career goals and continue on your career development journey. 

In addition to these identity-based resources, we encourage you to check out the additional resources on our website, and welcome you to schedule an appointment with your Career Coach through Handshake. 

Missing a resource? We are always open to feedback! Email us at career@xavier.edu

A student of color is a person who identifies as one or more of the following racial or ethnic groups: Black, Native Hawaiian, Alaskan Native, Native American, Desi, Asian, Pacific Islander, Hispanic or Latinx.

In addition to the services provided by the Career Development Office for all students, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni of color, we invite you at any time to make an appointment with a career coach to discuss your journey.

How can I highlight my background?

As a person of color, you may have a set of experiences and a perspective that can benefit a future employer or organization. Reflect on how your lived experience enhances you as a potential candidate who will contribute to a more diverse and inclusive workforce. Highlight these skills and benefits when applying for an internship or job. Consider highlighting academic and professional connections you have made, leadership positions you have held, or other elements of your personal life experience. 

For support and guidance in adding diversity components to your resume, check out this resource from Diversity First Jobs. This resource gives you tips and suggestions on how to stand out and put your diverse experience on your resume. Your resume and application materials should paint a picture of your skills and experiences that you bring to the interview. 

How can I tell if an employer values diversity and inclusion? 

The first step is to do some research on the employer to understand their company culture. Do they have a diversity and inclusion statement on their website? What data can you find about their workforce on their website? Do they offer training and development programs for staff to promote inclusion in their organization? Additionally, you can check to see if the employer is on Diversity Inc.’s top 50 companies for diversity and inclusion management. This website also has more information on how to evaluate and analyze employer hiring practices.

How can I connect with other students, alumni, and professionals of color?

There are many ways to expand your network for your personal, social and career growth. The Xavier Center for Diversity and Inclusion is an excellent place to connect. Their mission is to serve as a catalyst for social change at Xavier and beyond.The CDI is home to several Student Identity Groups you might like to investigate as well as the National Pan-Hellenic Organizations on campus. It is a valuable and rewarding effort to find and connect with students who have similar backgrounds and interests, helping you feel more connected to the Xavier campus community.

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professionals with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor our program coordinators at mentor@xavier.edu with questions.

Job & Internship Postings 

  • INROADS, inc: This nonprofit organization offers paid internships to high school seniors and college students who have at least 27 credit hours left before graduation. Students can be focused on a variety of majors and career interests, including business, economics, software engineering, supply chain management, retail management, health care, and liberal arts. 
  • Minority Access, Inc. connects undergraduate and graduate students with internship opportunities at government agencies in the Washington, D.C. area. The organization pays stipends, benefits, travel expenses, and offers housing assistance. 
  • SEO Career offers several programs including an internship program that pairs students of color with paid opportunities in financial services, technology, business services, and real estate. SEO Career says that 80% of its interns receive full-time job offers from its partners.
  • Parker Dewey offers the largest network of highly motivated college students and recent graduates who are excited to complete short-term, paid, professional assignments.

  • DiversityJobs.com is the #1 diversity job board online. The site unites employers dedicated to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) with job-seeking Black Americans, Latinx, Asians, Native Americans, Women, Veterans, People with Disabilities, and Members of the LGBTQIA+ Community. Diversity Jobs publishes an annual list of Top Diversity Employers by industry and original thought leadership on a variety of workplace diversity topics.

How do I handle race and color discrimination in the workplace? 

The laws enforced by U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) protect you from employment discrimination when it involves:

  • Unfair treatment because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Harassment by managers, co-workers, or others in your workplace, because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Denial of a reasonable workplace change that you need because of your religious beliefs or disability.
  • Improper questions about or disclosure of your genetic information or medical information.
  • Retaliation because you complained about job discrimination or assisted with a job discrimination proceeding, such as an investigation or lawsuit.

Additional Resources: 

Depending upon your field of study and personal career goals, there are many professional associations and organizations you may desire to join.

 

 

Currently, around half of all students attending college are the first in their families to do so. First-generation (first-gen) students have many strengths, tend to have higher satisfaction in college compared with non-first-gen peers, increased learning gains, and a greater ability to overcome setbacks of all kinds. Still, there are many challenges that first-gen students encounter in college. Click here to read a little more about Challenges Faced by First-Gen Students.

In addition to the services provided by the Career Development Office for all students, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni who is the first in your family to earn a four year degree, we invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss your journey.

How do I meet the challenges of being a First-Generation student? 

First-generation students may face unique psychological, academic, financial, and social challenges as they acclimate to life in the university setting. Seek the guidance of supportive peers, faculty, and administrators in order to manage the academic, social, and economic stresses of college. Family support and assimilation into the college community are the two factors most positively associated with graduation. Xavier offers many resources to support you:

How can I connect with other first-generation students, alumni, and professionals? 

The Student Wellness Advocacy Group (SWAG) is a national student organization that focuses on college health and safety issues. Peer Educators (PE) engage in meaningful opportunities to create a healthy campus community that supports student scucess. You can contact the SWAG PE's for more information at SWAG@xavier.edu

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

 Job & Internship Postings 

  • INROADS, inc: This nonprofit organization offers paid internships to high school seniors and college students who have at least 27 credit hours left before graduation. Students can be focused on a variety of majors and career interests, including business, economics, software engineering, supply chain management, retail management, health care, and liberal arts. 
  • Parker Dewey offers the largest network of highly motivated college students and recent graduates who are excited to complete short-term, paid, professional assignments.

  • DiversityJobs.com is the #1 diversity job board online. The site unites employers dedicated to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) with job-seeking Black Americans, Latinx, Asians, Native Americans, Women, Veterans, People with Disabilities, and Members of the LGBTQIA+ Community. Diversity Jobs publishes an annual list of  Top Diversity Employers by industry and original  thought leadership on a variety of workplace diversity topics.

Additional Resources: 

Depending upon your field of study and personal career goals, there are many professional associations and organizations you may desire to join.

On this page you will find career and campus resources for students who identify as LGBTQIA+ and their allies. These students identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (or questioning), asexual, intersexual, and two-spirited.

In addition to the services provided by the Career Development Office for all students, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni who identifies as LGBTQIA+ and their allies, we invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss your journey.

How do I best represent myself as a job candidate? 

Including a name that is different from your legal name, pronouns that do not match others' assumptions of your identity, or your involvement in LGBTQ community groups, college clubs, and volunteering on your resume can reveal your LGBTQ identity to an employer.

For students who assume leadership roles within LGBTQ-oriented student organizations and projects, as well as students pursuing LGBTQ research or academic coursework, the creation of a resume that reflects these experiences highlights their interpersonal strengths, capacity for leadership, critical thinking skills, and intercultural fluency. However, disclosing those roles comes with risk if the employer has a bias against LGBTQ people. Conversely, omitting these experiences from a professional resume is detrimental to both the candidate and the employer that might weigh these positively in the hiring process.

The Columbia University Center for Career Education provides tremendous guidance and resources to help you manage your job search as an LGBTQ candidate. The professionals in the Xavier Career Development Office are here to support you in creating a resume, cover letter, and job applications that honor you and what you bring to the process. We invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss and prepare your materials.

How can I tell if an employer values diversity and inclusion?

The first step is to do some research on the employer to understand their company culture. Do they have a diversity and inclusion statement on their website? What data can you find about their workforce on their website? Do they offer training and development programs for staff to promote inclusion in their organization?

Additionally, you can check to see if the employer is on Diversity Inc.’s top 50 companies for diversity and inclusion management. This website also has more information on how to evaluate and analyze employer hiring practices.

How can I connect with other students, alumni, and professionals who identify as LGBTQIA+? 

There are many ways to expand your network for your personal, social and career growth. The Xavier Center for Diversity and Inclusion is an excellent place to connect. Their mission is to serve as a catalyst for social change at Xavier and beyond. The CDI is also home to several Student Identity Groups you might like to investigate. It is a valuable and rewarding effort to find and connect with students who have similar backgrounds and interests, helping you feel more connected to the Xavier campus community.

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

Job & Internship Postings 

How do I handle discrimination in the workplace? 

The laws enforced by U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) protect you from employment discrimination when it involves:

  • Unfair treatment because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Harassment by managers, co-workers, or others in your workplace, because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Denial of a reasonable workplace change that you need because of your religious beliefs or disability.
  • Improper questions about or disclosure of your genetic information or medical information.
  • Retaliation because you complained about job discrimination or assisted with a job discrimination proceeding, such as an investigation or lawsuit.

How can I be supported once I find a job? 

We recommend that you stay connected the best way you can. Out Professionals is the leading nonprofit networking organization for LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning) professionals in the USA. Our organization and events are open to both established and aspiring professionals as well as supportive community allies. 

The Human Rights Campaign envisions a world where every member of the LGBTQ family has the freedom to live their truth without fear, and with equality under the law. They empower over 3 million members and supporters to mobilize against attacks on the most marginalized people in our community.

Additional Resources: 

Depending upon your field of study and personal career goals, there are many professional associations and organizations you may desire to join.

Upon acceptance to the University, students with disabilities are strongly encouraged to contact the Office of Disability Services as soon as possible. Many accommodations require advanced planning and early identification of a student’s needs helps to ensure that arrangements and accommodations can be made in a timely manner.

The Career Development Office shares in the same goals in serving our Xavier students with disabilities:

  • Ensure that all students with disabilities can freely and actively participate in all facets of university life.
  • Provide and coordinate support services to maximize students' educational potential and develop their independence to the fullest extent possible.
  • Strive to increase the level of awareness among all members of the university community so that students with disabilities are able to perform at a level limited only by their abilities, not their disabilities.
  • Identify and engage strategies that effectively offset disability and enhance academic success.

In addition to the services provided by the Career Development Office for all students, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni with a disability, we invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss your journey.

How do I best represent myself as a candidate for career opportunities? 

Disclosing a disability requires thought and planning. Many individuals with disabilities feel uncertain about disclosure. Ultimately, the job candidate must decide the time, place, and degree of information to share with others. Disclosure of a disability is not required. 

Career OneStop suggests job candidates should be aware that once disclosure of a disability or an accommodation request is made, employers may ask the employee about the limitations related to the job and are permitted to make medical inquiries. If you have a visable disability, you may want to anticipate the concerns of the employer. 

Consider taking charge during the first interview to talk about your disability and how you would handle any impact on the job. You may want to discuss any accommodation you use, how it helps your performance, or demonstrate how you would perform difficult functions. Many experts suggest disclosing before a job offer in order to communicate self-confidence and refocus the employer's attention on your ability to do the job. Some people with non-visible disabilities may choose not to disclose their disability at all. 

How do I know if an employer has good standards for accessibility? 

Workplace accessibility is more important than ever from a business, ethical, and legal standpoint. 

Essential Accessibility outlines 6 Strategies for ADA Compliance in the Workplace. They include:

  1. Avoid Disability Assumptions
  2. Follow the Official Process
  3. Maintain Thorough Documentation
  4. Treat Workers As Individuals
  5. Digital Accessibility Matters Too
  6. Keep in mind the FMLA

How can I connect with other students, alumni, and professionals with disabilities? 

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD), a federally-funded project under the U.S. Department of Education, provides information through their national online clearinghouse and through  their student group, DREAM. It is a great resource for making connections! 

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

How do I handle discrimination in the workplace? 

The laws enforced by U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) protect you from employment discrimination when it involves:

  • Unfair treatment because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Harassment by managers, co-workers, or others in your workplace, because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Denial of a reasonable workplace change that you need because of your religious beliefs or disability.
  • Improper questions about or disclosure of your genetic information or medical information.
  • Retaliation because you complained about job discrimination or assisted with a job discrimination proceeding, such as an investigation or lawsuit.

Job & Internship Postings

Additional Resources:

Velvet Jobs Employment with a Disability Resource Guide serves as a foundation block for employment. If you are a person living with a disability, questions may come up that another job seeker may not have to answer. You may wonder how a place of employment would make accommodations for you, or if there are certain companies that focus on helping people with disabilities find employment. This guide has that information and more.

Since 1995, AbilityJobs has been the leading career website dedicated to employment of people with disabilities. They have helped hundreds of thousands of job seekers with disabilities connect with leading employers, establishing themselves as one of the premier resources for disability talent acquisition and branding. They maintain the largest resume bank of candidates with disabilities, from entry level candidates to PhD.

We partner with the International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) office as they support students and scholars from abroad to achieve their academic goals and enrich the campus community with opportunities for growth through cross-cultural interaction.

In addition to the services provided by the Career Development Office for all students, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni who comes from abroad, we invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss your journey.

What steps do I take if I want to work while I am a student in the US? 

International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) works closely with faculty, staff, campus organizations and community groups to ensure that international students, scholars, and their families have the greatest opportunity to achieve their academic and personal goals. ISSS serves as the focal point on campus that deals with the unique needs, questions and concerns of those who come to Xavier University from abroad. They have an Employer Guide that provides direction and their staff are eager to help you move through that process.

The Career Development team is committed to helping students prepare for and pursue their professional development. Your job or internship search is a multi-step process, which involves writing your cover letter and resume, searching for positions to apply, and interviewing for positions.  Schedule an appointment with a Career Coach for personalized assistance.

Student employment jobs are considered to be an important piece of a student's professional development. In addition to learning valuable skills and beginning to build their resumes, students are given the opportunity to connect with Xavier University on a professional level. The ISSS or your Career Coach can help you along the way.

TYPES OF JOBS
  • On-Campus and Off-Campus
  • Work Study and Non-Work Study
  • Undergraduate and Graduate
ADVANTAGES OF A COLLEGE JOB
  • Helps to Offset College Expenses
  • Develops Essential Job Skills
  • Provides Training and Experience in Professional Environment
  • Resume Building and University Recommendations

What are the standards for a resume in the US? 

The  Career Guide is an excellent resource to get you started, providing tips and samples for the various documents you will need to create throughout your search, including resumes, cover letters, reference sheets, and thank you notes. 

We are here to help our international students prepare a resume according to current US standards. On our website you will find sample resumes organized by career cluster. Please use these samples as a guide for brainstorming what types of experiences you might include on your own document.

Developing an effective resume that highlights your relevant qualifications to the position is crucial in a successful job or internship search in the US. It is a marketing tool that highlights your education and relevant skills, experiences and accomplishments for a specific position.

In addition, take note of the following cultural differences in resumes:

A US resume includes:

  • Personal information such as full name and contact information (cellphone & email)
  • Links to personal website, blog, or LinkedIn profile (optional)
  • Education (highest degree first)
  • Relevant coursework (optional)
  • Relevant experiences in addition to formal internships or jobs:
  • research experiences
  • course/independent projects
  • student leadership
  • volunteering
  • skills (language, computer, etc.)

A US resume DOES NOT include:

  • Personal information such as:
  • age
  • gender
  • marital status
  • race/ethnicity
  • home country
  • Immigration status
  • Photograph
  • Religion
  • English as a language skill
  • International permanent address
  • Grammatical or spelling errors
  • TOEFL or SAT scores

 What does it look like to interview for a US employer? 

The interview is your opportunity to sell your qualifications and to gather information. The interview allows you to match your talents, interests, and experience to the needs of the employer. Your goal in the interview is to convince the employer that you are the right person for the job and to evaluate whether it is the right position for you.

Career Development offers mock interviews for students and alumni. To participate in this service you may  schedule a meeting with a career coach

The Muse also has a list of 50 common interview questions. Check out this resource to learn more about what types of things you might be asked in interviews. 

How can I connect with other international students, alumni, and professionals? 

There are many ways to expand your network for your personal, social and career growth. The Xavier Center for International Education Programming is an excellent place to connect. These programs provide opportunities for the Xavier community (students, faculty, and staff) to participate in a variety of activities. Click here for more information about our campus-wide programs.

The CDI is home to several Student Identity Groups you might like to investigate. It is a valuable and rewarding effort to find and connect with students who have similar backgrounds and interests, helping you feel more connected to the Xavier campus community. 

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

Job & Internship Postings 

  • InternshipFinder provides excellent insight and resources to help you consider how to go about seeking an internship while studying at Xavier. As always, continue to work with ISSS on campus to guide you through the process.
  • DiversityJobs.com is the #1 diversity job board online. The site unites employers dedicated to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) with job-seeking Black Americans, Latinx, Asians, Native Americans, Women, Veterans, People with Disabilities, and Members of the LGBTQIA+ Community. Diversity Jobs publishes an annual list of  Top Diversity Employers by industry and original  thought leadership on a variety of workplace diversity topics.

  • The International Student provides additional resources and information about job seeking in the US and offers a job board geared toward recruiting international students. 
  • Idealist is another international job search portal with thousands of global job opportunities. 
  • UN Careers offers the Young Professionals Program (YPP), which is a recruitment initiative for talented professional sto start a career as an international civil servant with the United Nations Secretariat. 

In addition to the services provided by the Career Development Office for all students, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni who identifies as a woman, we invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss your journey.

How can I tell if an employer values diversity and inclusion? 

The first step is to do some research on the employer to understand their company culture. Do they have a diversity and inclusion statement on their website? What data can you find about their workforce on their website? Do they offer training and development programs for staff to promote inclusion in their organization? Additionally, you can check to see if the employer is on Diversity Inc.’s top 50 companies for diversity and inclusion management. This website also has more information on how to evaluate and analyze employer hiring practices.

How do I handle discrimination in the workplace? 

The laws enforced by U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) protect you from employment discrimination when it involves:

  • Unfair treatment because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Harassment by managers, co-workers, or others in your workplace, because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older), or genetic information.
  • Denial of a reasonable workplace change that you need because of your religious beliefs or disability.
  • Improper questions about or disclosure of your genetic information or medical information.
  • Retaliation because you complained about job discrimination or assisted with a job discrimination proceeding, such as an investigation or lawsuit.

How can I connect with other students, alumni and professionals who are women? 

The fall of 2019 marked 50 years since Xavier’s undergraduate day program opened to women, breaking a 138-year, men-only tradition. Through academic, student, athletic, mission, diversity, and alumni events and programming, we celebrate the contributions, achievements and sustaining impact that women have had—and continue to have—on Xavier University. Visit Women of Xavier to connect!

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

Job & Internship Postings 

  • Parker Dewey offers the largest network of highly motivated college students and recent graduates who are excited to complete short-term, paid, professional assignments.

  • DiversityJobs.com is the #1 diversity job board online. The site unites employers dedicated to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) with job-seeking Black Americans, Latinx, Asians, Native Americans, Women, Veterans, People with Disabilities, and Members of the LGBTQIA+ Community. Diversity Jobs publishes an annual list of  Top Diversity Employers by industry and original  thought leadership on a variety of workplace diversity topics.

  • JobsForWomen features the latest well-paying job opportunities for female job seekers from companies who are sincerely dedicated to diversity hiring.

  • FAIRYGODBOSS: alternate job board for female job seekers! 

How can I pursue equity in wages and negotiate a job offer? 

While not the only item to negotiate, salaries are what often first come to mind. Many are nervous or scared to negotiate. It is an important thing to consider and do, though, when finding that the offer does not match your needs and wants. As a Xavier student or alumni who identifies as a woman, we invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach to discuss how to negotiate salary, benefits and more.

The Student Veterans Center has multiple resources available to Veterans and military affiliated students including financial aid and planning, academic advising, and career coaching. Contact Jason D. Nahrgang, SPHR Assistant Director, Career and External Relations, for career development support from the military perspective.

In addition to the services provided by the Veterans Center and the Career Development Office, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier Veteran or military affiliated student or alumni, we also invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach in the Career Development Center to discuss your journey.

How can I highlight my military background? 

Transitioning to a civilian career may take some adjustment. Each military job has different experiences so it is important to identify the military experience you have that is applicable to jobs in which you are interested. Resume.com provides valuable information such as what military experience is, how to list military experience on your resume and review some examples that show how you can list your military experience on your resume. Again, the professional staff in the Veterans Center and the Career Development Office are eager to help you build an amazing resume!

How can I connect with other veteran and military affiliated students, staff, and professionals? 

Student Veterans Support strives to provide Veteran and military affiliated students with a full range of services and programs designed to help students transition to campus successfully and thrive both academically and professionally. 

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

Jobs & Internship Postings 

  • The Pathways Internship Program allows students to join VA in career positions that emphasize long-term training and development. Pathways internships are open to current students who are legally permitted to work in the U.S.
  • DiversityJobs.com is the #1 diversity job board online. The site unites employers dedicated to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) with job-seeking Black Americans, Latinx, Asians, Native Americans, Women, Veterans, People with Disabilities, and Members of the LGBTQIA+ Community. Diversity Jobs publishes an annual list of  Top Diversity Employers by industry and original  thought leadership on a variety of workplace diversity topics.

  • VetsJobs is a leader on employment for the military and Veteran community. They offer job seekers exclusive access to more than 3.5 million employment opportunities and their premier job placement program. 
  • RecruitMilitary works to empower Veterans and military spouses through meaningful career opportunities. Whether you are starting a new career, going back to school, or looking for a fresh opportunity, RecruitMilitary has thousands of partners who are looking for military talent. 

In addition to the services provided by the Student Academic Center, we hope the following additional resources will help you along your career journey. We want to help you connect to resources on campus and to be career ready while acknowledging and celebrating the background and story that shapes who you are and helps define your unique path.

As a Xavier student or alumni athlete, we also invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach in the Career Development Center to discuss your journey.

How can I highlight my athletics experience on my resume? 

On your resume, describe your athletic experience in the same way you would describe your campus involvement or work experience. What was your role on the team? How would coaches and other team members describe you? Focus on your accomplishments. Select the skills that are transferable to your career interests and demonstrate the qualifications required for the position, organization, or industry to which you are applying. You can list your athletic experience under Activities, Campus Involvement, Athletics, Relevant Experience, or Leadership Experience on your resume. Include a few short bullets highlighting your achievements, and describing what you did, how you did it, and any results. You can find an example on the Career Development website.

The key is to recognize the skills you possess and adapt them to the situation you are looking toward, describing them in professional terms. If you list the skills that you use to manage your sporting commitments, you will see that they can be transferred to other environments. In fact, you will find they are quite valuable in the work environment, which means that if marketed correctly, you will be very attractive to a potential employer.

Your athletic involvement and student-athlete experience can show your

  • Willingness to “go the extra mile”
  • Communication and leadership skills
  • Work ethic that can set you apart from other candidates
  • Collaboration skills in a team environment
  • Ability to manage your time – balancing practices, training, traveling, and your academic course load
  • Competitive spirit that can drive you to excel in the workplace

As a Xavier student or alumni athlete, we also invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach in the Career Development Office to help you craft an excellent resume, cover letter, and more to showcase your athletics and leadership experiences.

How can I connect with other student and alumni athletes? 

Xavier student athletes have many opportunities to connect as a community while on campus. As members of NCAA Division I Athletics, Xavier has a Student Athlete Advisory Council made up of student athletes who provide insight on the campus experience and offer input on the rules and policies that affect their lives.

Xavier also offers robust mentor programs so you have the opportunity to network and build relationships with professional with whom you share similar career interests including Flash Mentoring and the Professional Mentor Program. If you have any questions about our mentor programs, feel free to reach out to mentor@xavier.edu with questions. 

Job & Internship Postings 

  • Perhaps you know exactly what you want to do after graduation, and putting the time in to do an internship is worth it… but with a student-athlete's schedule will an internship be too demanding? At Athlete Network the employer partners understand student-athletes also have commitments to their team and they value those experiences and the mindset it takes to compete at the collegiate level.

We are happy you have chosen to make Xavier part of your long term career journey. Career Development provides developmental and comprehensive career directed services to all Xavier students and alumni. We collaborate with campus and community partners to connect, educate, and empower undergraduate and graduate students and alumni with relevant resources and services to achieve meaningful careers over their lifetime. As a Xavier graduate student or alumni, we also invite you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach in the Career Development Center to discuss your process and how we can support you.

How can I highlight my unique and personal experience on my resume? 

There may come a time in your life when you decide to change careers – perhaps even more than once. Career changes happen for several reasons, and when they do, it is advantageous to be strategic in your actions. A researched, thoughtful career change will likely lead to greater job satisfaction . Indeed offers some insight as to why someone might change career paths and how you might plan your next career move.

Have you decided it's time to make a career change? When making a career transition, it can be hard to know where to start. One important first step is to update your resume for the industry you want to transition into. Having your resume updated will allow you to quickly apply for job openings as they come along. Below are some tips to refresh your resume for your career change. USNews offers more details on the following guidelines:

  • Clarify your new career direction.
  • Use a master document of your accomplishments.
  • Create a master copy of your resume.
  • Determine what resume format is best for you.
  • Tailor your resume to each position.
  • Chose which accomplishments you want to feature.
  • Write a career change resume objective statement.
  • Keep your resume relevant.

You can find an example on the Career Development website for a professional who has gone through a career change. The key is to recognize the skills you possess and adapt them to the situation you are looking toward, describing them in professional terms. You will see that skills developed in one industry can certainly be transferred to other environments. We call these transferrable skills, and when marketed correctly, you will see yourself as a very attractive candidate to a potential employer in your new industry.

As a Xavier graduate student or alumni, we eagerly encourage you at any time to  make an appointment with a career coach in the Career Development Office to help you craft an excellent resume, cover letter, and more that will highlight your professional experiences.

How can I connect with other graduate students and alumni? 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is a student led organization dedicated to enhancing the graduate student experience at Xavier University. GSA acts as an advocacy group for individual and collective concerns relating to issues affecting graduate student life at the University. GSA, formed in 2008 serves to disseminate information to the graduate student community, provide support to enhance the educational and professional development of its members and improve the quality of life for all graduate students at Xavier University.

There are also more than 75,000 graduates living in dozens of states and countries around the world! You can become a member of the National Alumni Association, which is comprised of many communities. 

In addition to the National Alumni Association, additional alumni communities exhibit and promote our Mission throughout their local areas. What is an affinity group? Well, it’s a group of people — in this case, Xavier alumni — who are connected because of another common interest. But it also goes deeper than that. These connected alumni have a purpose, a cause. They want to do something. They are a part of this specific group, but above all, they are Xavier alumni too, carrying on the University Mission.