UNDERGRADUATE CORE CURRICULUM

First-Year Seminar Courses 2019

You'll take a FYS within your first two semesters at Xavier. FYS is a rigorous, academic, 3-credit course. In the catalog, FYS is called CORE 100. Search under "Core Curriculum" to find these courses.

Fall 2020

Growing Pains
Kelly Austin

Sow elcome to college, that space between adolescence and full-blown adulting. That means the freedoms and responsibilities of adulthood, without the experience. It's a time to explore who you want to be (identity) and what you want to do (vocation). Some psychologists call this developmental phase emerging adulthood. In this section of First-Year Seminar, we'll study the psychological theories of development and see what makes this phase of life unique and interesting and challenging--and sometimes terrifying. After all, they're called "growing pains" for a reason. We'll also examine literature that highlights emerging adulthood, and use those discussions to investigate your own journey on the path to adulthood.

 

State-Sanctioned Violence in the U.S.

ShaDawn Battle

On February 23, 2020, a Black man was gunned down for jogging while Black. His murderers insisted that they were fulfilling a civic duty. This heinous murder flew under the national radar for over a month. But why? Ida B. Wells once argued that the grotesque spectacles of anti-violence during Post-Reconstruction were so common that they "failed to have any visible effect upon the human sentiments of the people of our land." And still today, the ubiquitous scenes of violence enacted against Black bodies have desensitized the nation in teh worst way. This seminar will expose the multi-faceted nature of state-sanctioned, anti-Black violence in the U.S. through literary representations, such as The Hate U Give; critical discourse, such as The New Jim Crow; real case examples, such as the Sandra Bland and Michael Brown murder cases; and through propular media such as 13th and When They See Us. In efforts to arouse empathetic reactions in response to state-sanctioned violence, students will become cultural curators, producing TEDTalks, zines, and protest songs. Students should also expect seminar-style discussions, resulting in the production of critical, analytical, and reflective prose.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Ethics, Justice and the Environment
Brent Blair

We each depend on the environment in obvious and subtle ways. But, how we perceive nature and choose to treat it depends on many factors including time period, culture, and economic status. In this course we will explore these ideas as well as how degraded environments impact human wellbeing differently depending on who you are (e.g., race, class & gender) and where you live. Basic ecological and environmental science principles will be explored.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Slow Food: We Are What We Eat
Kelly Blank

Slow Food is an international movement that began in Italy in 1986, emphasizing Good, Clean, and Fair food. In this First Year Seminar, we will discuss the history, philosophy, and influence of the Slow Food movement worldwide while examining the problems with the modern agricultural machine both in a local and in a global context. Topics of discussion will include the importance of local and seasonal produce, the inherent connections between plate and planet, the water footprint of food, labeling of GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms), biodiversity, and the ethics of meat production and consumption.

 

Metaphor, Memes, and the Power of Language

Jane Conzett

What does human language reveal about what we believe? We will explore metaphor and its role in our thinking, examine its use in multiple disciplines, take a dive into memes as a subset of metaphor, and look at the power of langauge "for good" and for malign purposes.

 

Sport at the Service of Humanity
Sr. Rose Ann Fleming

How can sport serve humanity? Selected readings show how sport brings humanity together across global boundaries to celebrate human talent, regardless of religion, race, culture, beliefs, gender and ability. Immersive experiences such as visits and interviews with members of professional teams and NCAA Division I teams, indicate how sport teaches men and women positive values of joy, respect, love, compassion, enlightenment and balance. Dialoguing with sport experts, and attendance at local sports games, enables the class participant to reflect, critique, and discuss, orally and in writing, the principles and values that sport offers humanity, as well as how to address the evils and scandals that can arise when the power of wealth and greed in sport corrupt the sport environment.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Entrepreneurship: How to Outswim the Sharks in the Tank
Mike Halloran

Course description coming soon

 

Transcending Humanity: The New Biology
James Helmer

The American futurist and transhumanist thinker Ray Kurzweil has suggested that the essence of humanity is our creation and employment of technology.In exploring ethical and religious themes in relation to emerging biotechnologies, this seminar will engage "big questions" such as the reality of God/the Transcendent, the meaning of human existence, and the nature of the human condition (e.g., embodiment, life, death, sickness, disease, finitude, moral perfection).The seminar will give particular consideration to the ethics of employing such biotechnologies in order to overcome human limitation and to fundamentally alter the human condition.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

 

The Power of Images: Photography and Social Justice
Johann Le Guelte

We are immersed in a visual culture, where images and iconographies, photographs and videos—whether seen on TV, the Internet or other digital platforms—determine the contours of our social identity and impact our perception of the world. Visual representations are undeniably powerful. So what can they teach us about issues of social justice? This course will examine how, exactly, images function and often mediate our understanding of history and the present. Topics covered will include photography and race, gender identity, migration, activism, politics, fashion, and more.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

#CollegeCulture
Jacki Lyon

Many first year students arrive on campus excited for the anticipated “college experience,” but what does this passage look like? #CollegeCulture examines college social justice themes including the hookup culture, racism, mental health as well as gender issues. Through nonfiction texts, academic research and expert speakers, students will examine normative beliefs as well as causes and effects related to these ethical and social concepts. The course is academically rigorous founded in research papers, reflective writing, and class presentations. #College Culture will prepare students to become active members in the community of scholars who embrace serving the Greater Good mission of Xavier.

 

Can Only One Religion Be True?
William Madges

Throughout history, Christianity has claimed to be the true religion. In light of the fact that there are many good people who are not Christian, can't more than one religion be true? But if religious beliefs and practices are different, how can all be true? The seminar explores what we mean by truth and salvation, and how to assess religious claims to truth.

This course includes a unit focused on issues of diversity and inclusion.

 

Food on the Move: From Ship to Shore

Margaret Martin

In this FYS, we explore food on the move, from ancient Roman olive oil to South African wine, from wars "won on their stomachs" to high-tech military labs, from banana boats to modern shipping containers. Our plates are full--of history, technology, logistics, economics, politics, ethics, and more.

 

The Human Need for Narrative
Anne McCarty

Story? Who needs it? For a phenomenon that seems to serve little practical purpose for human survival, narrative plays a significant and ongoing role in our lives. In this class, we'll explore various facets and functions of story and consider the following questions. How do we shape and how are we shaped by narrative? How do we employ narrative as we attempt to understand, cope with, and modify our past, present, and future both as individuals and as a society? How do the stories we currently produce and consume contribute to or detract from the greater good?

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

The Art of Expression: Cultivating Creativity for Balance, Growth, and Community

Madeleine Mitchell

Anyone can be an artist, but many people don't see themselves as one. This seminar explores how creative expression is an integral part of being human and how it contributes to personal and intellectual growth, meaningful life work, and stronger communities. In this course, we will examine various roles of artistic expression in society: healer, teller of hard truths, voice of solidarity, and catalyst for social change. Students will study and research examples of art movements, engage with local artists, and create individual works of art.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

You, Me, and #MeToo: American Feminism and the Rise of #MeToo
Robert Bradley Nestheide

Recent high-profile cases of sexual harassment and abuse saw the popularization of the phrase "Me Too" and its rise to prominence as a succinct an empathetic expression of solidarity with the long-standing struggle of women for social, political, and economic equality. This course will examine the history and politics of American feminism and women's movements with a particular focus on sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and the emergence of the #MeToo movement. Additionally, the course will examine the role of modern social media and internet communications in both the spread of the movement and in its increased success in bringing social, political, and legal repercussions to sexual abusers.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Infectious Diseases and the Cultural Politics of Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
Mich Nyawalo

In this course, students will study representations of infectious diseases and their impact on society through an analysis of literary works of fiction, historical books, as well as ethnographic texts. Students will study how a variety of authors, stemming from different national and historical contexts, center their works on human responses to pandemics in order to provide specific political and cultural insights. Students will also explore the ways in which social attitudes, rhetoric, actions, and policies regarding the spread of infectious diseases have often been shaped by the cultural politics of race, class, gender, and sexual mores. The course will cover the following specific topics (among others): the social impact of the 1665-1666 Great Plague of London, xenophobic responses to the spread of the bubonic plague in San Francisco’s China Town in 1900, the impact of systemic racism in contributing to the spread of tuberculosis in urban African-American communities, state responses to the AIDS epidemic in the United States and abroad, as well as fictional representations of infectious diseases. Recent cultural analyses of COVID-19’s impact will also be presented to students.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

On Common Ground: Mexico and the U.S.
Julia O'Hara

Mexico and the U.S. share one of the world's most important international partnerships. How has this relationship developed, and why has it become so tense? What does the greater good mean for the people of both nations? This class explores these and other questions through the history, politics and culture linking people on both sides of the border.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Villains and Antiheroes
Niamh J. O’Leary

This seminar asks if villains can serve the greater good and why we love good stories about bad guys. How do we as a society decide what makes a person "bad," and what value do we attach to that label? How has our understanding of a historical person's relative villainy or heroism changed over time? Together, we will consider the definitions of heroism and villainy, debate whether you can work toward justice from outside the system, and study nontraditional approaches to the good-from revenge narratives, to tales of vigilante justice, to fortunate falls, to damaged or despicable "everyman" heroes.

This course includes a unit focused on issues of diversity and inclusion.

 

Pollinators: Birds, Bees, Sneeze
Ann Ray

Flowering plants are the dominant organisms in nearly every terrestrial ecosystem on the planet. Humans rely on flowering plants for food, shelter, warmth, fiber, pharmaceuticals, and for the beauty and richness they bring to our lives. One cannot, however, consider the diversity and abundance of flowering plants without considering the crucial role of pollinators in their biology and evolution. Our planet is facing a global biodiversity crisis, and pollinator populations are threatened worldwide. In this course, we will explore the biology of flowering plants, the natural history and diversity of pollinators, the importance of pollinators in human culture, and the conservation of pollinators. This seminar offers exploration of ecological principles, and will help students to cultivate scientific literacy and environmental ethics.

 

It's Alive!: From Frankenstein to Artificial Intelligence
David Reid

In this multidisciplinary seminar, we’ll begin with a close reading of Mary Shelley’s timeless 1818 novel Frankenstein and will trace its evolution into the pop-culture icon it has become. Included in the first part of the course will be literary analysis that situates Shelley’s masterpiece in historical and philosophical context. In the second half of the course, we will extend the themes and ideas of Frankenstein into our modern world of artificial intelligence, considering issues of The Common Good along the way. The course materials will include four novels, one biography and several films. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein…200 years old…and yet…it’s alive!

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.


Confederate Monuments
Frank Rzeczkowski

This seminar examines the current controversies over monuments to the Confederacy through an examination of the broader historical, social, cultural, and political contexts surrounding the issue. We will also explore the ideas and purposes behind memorialization in a broader sense (including on Xavier’s campus), and seek to understand the decision-making process behind memorialization and the messages memorials seek to convey.

 

Walking: An Historical Act

Kathleen Smythe

Walking is one of the hallmarks of being human. And yet, as 21st-century humans, we either take it for granted or rarely engage in it. This course aims to correct both of these cultural failings. This is an experiential learning course. We will walk, we will read, we will explore, we will talk to people we meet on the way, and we will share with each other what we learn.

 

Gimme More!: A History of Stuff

Amy Whipple

This class will explore the history and ethics of consumerism in Western society from the 1700s to the present. How have people made stuff, sold stuff, designed stuff, and decided who gets stuff? And why have people wanted all this stuff anyway?

 

Race in the Digital Age

Kayla Wheeler

This course will take an intersectional approach to explore the role that the Internet has had on our understanding of race in the United States and beyond. While often imagined as a post-race space, this course will show how the Internet has been central to constructing, policing, and challenging racial formations in the 21st century. Special attention will be paid to social media, apps, virtual reality, and video games. Topics covered include the digital divide, the Black Lives Matter movement, GamerGate, social media influencers and the rise of TikTok. 

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Ireland, Culture, & Film
Timothy White

Employing film as a means of expressing and critiquing culture, this course explores the development of Irish nationalism and those who were not fully included in historic conceptions of Irish national identity. How did Irish nationalism marginalize women, Protestants, travellers, emigrants, new arrivals, and the poor in society? Have recent changes in Ireland contributed to a more inclusive national conception of the greater good? How has Northern Ireland developed a separate culture? Has historic Protestant ascendancy given way to parity of esteem and a true peace since the Good Friday Agreement?

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Spring 2020

Saint Francis and Pope Francis
Gillian Ahlgren

What happens when the sincerity of one of Christianity's most famous saints meets the vision of history's first Jesuit pope? Why did Pope Francis choose the name "Francis"? What did/does he hope to accomplish? How do we in Jesuit institutions today walk in the footsteps of both of these spiritual leaders?

 

Old Texts, New Media
Kelly Austin

This seminar will explore adaptations of classic literature, including Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles. We’ll examine a live production, traditional films, TV series, and even a YouTube adaptation. As part of the course, students will attend one live performance. Students will study theories on adaptation, digital media, and fandoms.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester,particularly in examining modern adaptations of classic texts.

 

Ethics, Justice and the Environment
Brent Blair

We each depend on the environment in obvious and subtle ways. But, how we perceive nature and choose to treat it depends on many factors including time period, culture, and economic status. In this course we will explore these ideas as well as how degraded environments impact human wellbeing differently depending on who you are (e.g., race, class & gender) and where you live. Basic ecological and environmental science principles will be explored.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Slow Food: We Are What We Eat
Kelly Blank

Slow Food is an international movement that began in Italy in 1986, emphasizing Good, Clean, and Fair food. In this First Year Seminar, we will discuss the history, philosophy, and influence of the Slow Food movement worldwide while examining the problems with the modern agricultural machine both in a local and in a global context. Topics of discussion will include the importance of local and seasonal produce, the inherent connections between plate and planet, the water footprint of food, labeling of GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms), biodiversity, and the ethics of meat production and consumption.

 

Games & Virtue
Greg Braun

This course looks at games of all types, with a focus on board, card, and role playing games. What can games today and throughout history tell us about humanity? What virtues and skills are valued by games, and by society? What does the mathematical field of game theory tell us about how people make decisions, particularly important ethical decisions? How do probability and the mechanics of games affect what we take away from them? What is the nature of play itself? Students will design a game as a group project throughout the semester.

 

Remembering the Days of Slavery
Randy Browne

In 1975, the Jamaican reggae artist Burning Spear recorded "Slavery Days." His song asked a simple question-"Do you remember the days of slavery?" And he urged, "Cry and remember, please remember." This course takes up Burning Spear's challenge, asking how the history of Atlantic slavery has been remembered, represented, and memorialized on both sides of the Atlantic. What have different people and institutions chosen to remember-and forget-about the history of Atlantic slavery? How should we decide which representations to accept or reject? And how do our memories of the past shape our understanding of the present and hopes for the future?

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

House of Dawn: Grand Canyon and Navajo Nation
Leon Chartrand

Sacred Navajo places-like Grand Canyon, Monument Valley and Canyon de Chelly-teach us what it means to be human. In sacred places, we touch the pulse of a living planet. We feel fully alive because these places are fully alive. There, we discover the center of being. Flowing through us like breath are timeless lessons borne from a silence that transcends space and time. Just as the Ancient Ones did, we go to these places not for beauty and inspiration, but for the lessons. This course includes travel over Spring Break to the Grand Canyon and the Navajo Nation.

You must pre-register and deposit at http://xavierexpeditions.com/

 

Searching for Meaning in a Scientific Age
Daniel Dwyer

Can science explain everything? Are yesterday's mysteries inevitably going to be tomorrow's scientific problems? In this seminar, we will discuss the relation between scientific explanations and the individual's search for a life that makes sense. We will explore contemporary questions about love, family, friendship; human excellence and dignity; teaching, learning, and truth. At stake is whether modern science can explain away these genuinely human phenomena, or whether they still leave room for a role for philosophy and theology to overcome the cynicism of today's youth.

 

Sport at the Service of Humanity
Sr. Rose Ann Fleming

How can sport serve humanity? Selected readings show how sport brings humanity together across global boundaries to celebrate human talent, regardless of religion, race, culture, beliefs, gender and ability. Immersive experiences such as visits and interviews with members of professional teams and NCAA Division I teams, indicate how sport teaches men and women positive values of joy, respect, love, compassion, enlightenment and balance. Dialoguing with sport experts, and attendance at local sports games, enables the class participant to reflect, critique, and discuss, orally and in writing, the principles and values that sport offers humanity, as well as how to address the evils and scandals that can arise when the power of wealth and greed in sport corrupt the sport environment.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Entrepreneurship: How to Outswim the Sharks in the Tank
Mike Halloran

Course description coming soon

 

Transcending Humanity: The New Biology
James Helmer

The American futurist and transhumanist thinker Ray Kurzweil has suggested that the essence of humanity is our creation and employment of technology.In exploring ethical and religious themes in relation to emerging biotechnologies, this seminar will engage "big questions" such as the reality of God/the Transcendent, the meaning of human existence, and the nature of the human condition (e.g., embodiment, life, death, sickness, disease, finitude, moral perfection).The seminar will give particular consideration to the ethics of employing such biotechnologies in order to overcome human limitation and to fundamentally alter the human condition.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Roots of the “Caravan”: A Look at U.S. Foreign Policy and Insights from the Jesuits in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras
Irene Hodgson

In this course we will examine different questions and perspectives regarding immigration on the southern border and also to Cincinnati looking at history, culture, politics, religion, etc.Is there an impending invasion of the migrant hordes or are individuals and groups asylum seekers? Are the conditions in their countries of origin related to U.S. foreign policy? If so, why would people seek to come here or send their children? How might the language we use to describe migrants reflect or shape our opinions and policies? How do we define who is an American? What do the Jesuits in those countries have to say to us about this? What does a commitment to the greater good require of us?

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Movies and their Meaning
David Inczauskis, S.J.

Some films are deep. They make us think and feel in new and challenging ways. In this class we will interpret a handful of particularly provocative movies. We will come to see how directors’ ideas influence the ways they craft their films. A close reading of several philosophers will provide us with a means of dialoguing with the films.

 

The Game of Chess
Adam Konopka

This course examines the history, iconography, and educational benefits of the game of chess. Games like chess play an important, but often overlooked, role in the fabric of a society. Chess, in particular, is one of the most enduring and universal games in human history. How do historical variations of chess reflect the social structures in which they were played? How has chess become symbolic of the human condition in works of literature such as Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass? How are skills such as spatial reasoning, strategic decision making, and concentration learned through playing chess? This course is oriented to novice and advanced players alike. No familiarity with chess is necessary.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

The Power of Images: Photography and Social Justice
Johann Le Guelte

We are immersed in a visual culture, where images and iconographies, photographs and videos—whether seen on TV, the Internet or other digital platforms—determine the contours of our social identity and impact our perception of the world. Visual representations are undeniably powerful. So what can they teach us about issues of social justice? This course will examine how, exactly, images function and often mediate our understanding of history and the present. Topics covered will include photography and race, gender identity, migration, activism, politics, fashion, and more.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Can Only One Religion Be True?
William Madges

Throughout history, Christianity has claimed to be the true religion. In light of the fact that there are many good people who are not Christian, can't more than one religion be true? But if religious beliefs and practices are different, how can all be true? The seminar explores what we mean by truth and salvation, and how to assess religious claims to truth.

 

The Human Need for Narrative
Anne McCarty

Story? Who needs it? For a phenomenon that seems to serve little practical purpose for human survival, narrative plays a significant and ongoing role in our lives. In this class, we'll explore various facets and functions of story and consider the following questions. How do we shape and how are we shaped by narrative? How do we employ narrative as we attempt to understand, cope with, and modify our past, present, and future both as individuals and as a society? How do the stories we currently produce and consume contribute to or detract from the greater good?

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

You, Me, and #MeToo: American Feminism and the Rise of #MeToo
Robert Bradley Nestheide

Recent high-profile cases of sexual harassment and abuse saw the popularization of the phrase "Me Too" and its rise to prominence as a succinct an empathetic expression of solidarity with the long-standing struggle of women for social, political, and economic equality. This course will examine the history and politics of American feminism and women's movements with a particular focus on sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and the emergence of the #MeToo movement. Additionally, the course will examine the role of modern social media and internet communications in both the spread of the movement and in its increased success in bringing social, political, and legal repercussions to sexual abusers.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

On Common Ground: Mexico and the U.S.
Julia O'Hara

Mexico and the U.S. share one of the world's most important international partnerships. How has this relationship developed, and why has it become so tense? What does the greater good mean for the people of both nations? This class explores these and other questions through the history, politics and culture linking people on both sides of the border.

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Villains and Antiheroes
Niamh J. O'Leary

This seminar asks if villains can serve the greater good and why we love good stories about bad guys. How do we as a society decide what makes a person "bad," and what value do we attach to that label? How has our understanding of a historical person's relative villainy or heroism changed over time? Together, we will consider the definitions of heroism and villainy, debate whether you can work toward justice from outside the system, and study nontraditional approaches to the good-from revenge narratives, to tales of vigilante justice, to fortunate falls, to damaged or despicable "everyman" heroes.

This course includes a unit focused on issues of diversity and inclusion.

 

Borderlands of Being Human
Don Prues

This course keeps coming back to one three-pronged overarching question: What is the human animal, why do we think the way we think, and why do we act the way we act? Ultimately, this course will challenge our assumptions and our motivations about what we believe, what choices we make, what opinions we hold, what's in our nature, and what it means to be human.

 

It's Alive!: FromFrankenstein to Artificial Intelligence
David Reid

In this multidisciplinary seminar, we’ll begin with a close reading of Mary Shelley’s timeless 1818 novelFrankenstein and will trace its evolution into the pop-culture icon it has become. Included in the first part of the course will be literary analysis that situates Shelley’s masterpiece in historical and philosophical context. In the second half of the course, we will extend the themes and ideas of Frankenstein into our modern world of artificial intelligence, considering issues of The Common Good along the way. The course materials will include four novels, one biography and several films. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein…200 years old…and yet…it’s alive!

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Native Americans and American Sovereignty
Frank Rzeczowski

Indians were the first inhabitants of what would become the United States--yet not until 1924 did all Native Americans become U.S. citizens. This course will examine the complex, unique, and often conflict-ridden relationship between Native Americans and the country they found themselves contained in, and exaine the struggle of Native peoples to become equal--yet remain separate--within American society.

 

Dante, Pilgrim of the Mind
Michael Sweeney

Dante will be our guide to college as a journey-a pilgrimage of the mind. Medieval pilgrimage was a physical journey to the Holy Land or to some other holy site that was meant to change and rehearse the journey of a life. In the Divine Comedy, Dante is often called a "pilgrim," but the Divine Comedy is a different kind of journey, an intellectual journey that is meant to change and rehearse the journey of a life. This course will propose the question whether college is merely job training or whether it is also an intellectual pilgrimage. We will read closely Dante's Divine Comedy with the assistance of selections from Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Thomas Aquinas' Summa theologiae.

 

Exploring Real and Imagined Places
Rebecca Todd

We all make journeys in our lives, through the known to the unknown, and back again. Where and how do we find ourselves? This seminar’s focus will be exploring real and imagined places, through reading (and creating) maps, pop culture artifacts, fiction and non-fiction. Students will be asked to write traditional essays and create multimodal ones.

 

Marriage: Crisis & Renewal
Marita von Weissenberg

How do we know what marriage is? How, when, and why does marriage challenge or renew the greater good, and how can we even know? This course seeks to complicate our assumptions of marriage by exploring what marriage has been, is, and might yet become within the Western tradition. We will examine notions of marriage by examining ways history, law, psychology, and literature – to name a few – study marriage.

 

Ireland, Culture, and Film
Timothy White

Employing film as a means of expressing and critiquing culture, this course explores the development of Irish nationalism and those who were not fully included in historic conceptions of Irish national identity. How did Irish nationalism marginalize women, Protestants, travellers, emigrants, new arrivals, and the poor in society? Have recent changes in Ireland contributed to a more inclusive national conception of the greater good? How has Northern Ireland developed a separate culture? Has historic Protestant ascendancy given way to parity of esteem and a true peace since the Good Friday Agreement?

This course addresses issues of diversity and inclusion throughout the semester.

 

Should We Treat Mental Illness?
Reneé Zucchero

To treat or not to treat mental illness, that is the question! Many people experience mental illness but do not receive treatment. Students will consider the experience and consequences of mental illness, various costs associated with treating and not treating mental illness, and form an educated opinion about whether it should be treated.

 

Page updated 15 May 2020