Format of Work

Books

  1. If the book is freely available online (in the public domain), just link to it. There are very few copyright limitations in linking to an online source.

  2. Use XPLORE to determine if the library owns the book you need.

  3. Request books the library does not own through ILLiad (interlibrary loan).

  4. If the book is likely to be used in future academic years or semesters, consider asking the library to purchase the book.

  5. If most of the book will be used, consider asking students to purchase the book.

  6. Faculty or library staff can provide links in Canvas to library-owned electronic books.

  7. Library staff can place library- or faculty-owned books on reserve for students to use.

  8. Students and faculty may copy small portions of a book (a chapter) for personal use.

  9. See Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers which includes the amount that can be used by format of the material.

  10. Library staff can digitize a small portion of a book (a chapter) and place it in Canvas for students to use; however, repeated use from semester to semester may be outside the scope of Fair Use and may require permission from the copyright holder

  11. Provide a full citation for the books you use: author(s), book title, publisher, publisher's location (city and state), and date.

  12. Need help with any of the above? Submit the Copyright Request Help form for assistance.

Image: Thomaseagle. (2006, March 31). Two Italian legal/accounting books. Retrieved June 27, 2014 from Wikimedia Web site: http://commons.wikimedia.org

Articles

  1. If the full-text of the article is freely available online (in an open-access journal or in the public domain) , just link to it. There are very few copyright limitations in linking to an online source.

  2. Use Search @ XU to locate the article you need. Then use Find It @ XU to determine if the library provides the full-text of the article.

    • If the full-text of the article is provided by the library, students and faculty may print the article for personal use.

    • The library can provide links to these full-text articles in Canvas.

  3. If full-text is not available in Search @ XU, then request the article through ILLiad (interlibrary loan).

    • Aarticles requested through ILLiad are ultimately sent to the user in full-text format. Users can then print a copy of the article for personal use.

    • The library can provide links to ILLiad-requested articles in Canvas; however, repeated use of an article from semester to semester may be outside the scope of Fair Use.

  4. Provide a full citation for the articles you use: author(s), article title, journal title, volume, issue, pages, date, and a link to the resource (frequently a doi number) or publisher's website if there is one.

  5. See Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers which includes the amount that can be used by format of the material.

  6. Need help with any of the above? Submit the Copyright Request Help form for assistance.

Image: Rachel. (2007, February 9). Retrieved June 27, 2014 from Flickr Web site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pigstubs/384864783/

Films and Videos

  1. If the film/video is freely available online just link to it. There are very few copyright limitations in linking to an online source.

  2. Use XPLORE to determine if the library owns the film/video you need.

  3. Request films/videos the library does not own through ILLiad (interlibrary loan).

  4. If the film/video is likely to be used in future academic years or semesters, consider asking the library to purchase the film/video.

  5. Consider asking students to purchase the film/video.

  6. Faculty or library staff can link to lawfully-owned streaming videos in Canvas.

    1. If the film is non-dramatic (e.g., an educational film, a documentary, an instructional video) you can use the whole film in your course.

    2. If the film is dramatic (e.g., a feature film, a Nike commercial, a reality TV show) you can only use reasonable, limited portions (minutes) of the film. See also Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers which includes the amount that can be used by format of the material.

  7. Library staff can place lawfully-owned films/videos on reserve for students to use.

  8. Provide a full citation for the films/videos you use: author(s), title, producer(s), producer's location (city and state), date, and a link to the resource if there is one.

  9. See also Fair Use Guidelines for Films and Videos (PDF)

  10. If a digital copy of the film/video is NOT available for purchase, you may convert the analog version to a digital DVD version. Submit the Copyright Request Help form for assistance in determining if the film/video is available for purchase. In addition, in 2010 the US Copyright Office announced a new exemption to copyright law that permits circumventing anti-piracy controls on DVDs so they may be converted to streaming videos. Contact Paul Weber in the Digital Media Lab (CLC 303, (513) 745-3682, weberp@xavier.edu) for assistance converting your media once it has been confirmed that a conversion is allowable.

  11. Need help with any of the above? Submit the Copyright Request Help form for assistance.

Music and Audio

  1. If the audio or music is freely available online just link to it. There are very few copyright limitations in linking to an online source.

  2. Use XPLORE to determine if the library owns the audio/music you need.

  3. Request the audio/music the library does not own through ILLiad (interlibrary loan).

  4. If the audio/music is likely to be used in future academic years or semesters, consider asking the library to purchase the audio/music.

  5. Consider asking students to purchase the audio/music.

  6. Faculty or library staff can link to or embed in Canvas lawfully-owned digital audio/music.

    1. Any music-only song recording (a simple mp3 or audio-only recording) can be placed in Canvas for your students in your class. However, you probably cannot put entire albums in Canvas.

    2. Only reasonable, limited portions (seconds) of operas, music videos, concert footage, etc. are allowed in Canvas. See also Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers which includes the amount that can be used by format of the material.

  7. If a digital copy of the audio/music is NOT available for purchase, you may be able to convert the analog version to a digital version using Xavier's Digital Media Lab. Contact Paul Weber in the Digital Media Lab (CLC 303, (513) 745-3682, weberp@xavier.edu) for more information about conversions.

  8. Library staff can place lawfully-owned audio/music on reserve for students to use.

  9. Provide a full citation for the audio/music you use: author(s), title, producer(s), producer's location (city and state), date, and a link to the resource if there is one.

  10. See also Fair Use Guidelines for Music and Audio (PDF)

  11. Need help with any of the above? Contact Submit the Copyright Request Help form for assistance.

Image: Mattes. (2008, June). Ohrmuschel mit Noten und Musikinstrumenten [Auricle with notes and musical instruments]. Retrieved June 27, 2014 from Wikimedia Web site: http://commons.wikimedia.org

Images and Photographs*

  1. If the image is freely available online, just link to it. There are very few copyright limitations in linking to an online source.

  2. Use images that are in the public domain, images you created, or photos you took.

  3. Purchase or obtain copyright permission for any other images you plan to use.

  4. Staff in the Digital Media Lab (3rd floor Conaton Learning Commons) can help students and faculty scan lawfully-owned analog images to a digital format.

  5. Faculty or library staff can provide links to or embed in Canvas lawfully-owned or freely available digital images.

  6. See Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers which includes the amount that can be used by format of the material.

  7. Library staff can help faculty and students restrict access to and prevent further dissemination of any copyrighted images by watermarking the image, removing the print capability, preventing the ability to copy and paste, and preventing the ability to download.

  8. Faculty must also make sure students in the class know if works are copyrighted and prominently post in their Canvas course or their syllabus the following statement: This material is presented for use solely by enrolled members of this course. Further reproduction or distribution of this material is expressly prohibited.

  9. Provide a full citation for the images you use: creator(s), title, date, a link, and source. The source could be a website, a book, or a journal.

  10. See Fair Use Guidelines for Images and Photographs (PDF).

  11. Need help with any of the above? Submit the Copyright Request Help form for assistance.

Image: Tom Photos. (2009, September). Cameras from large to small, film to digital. Retrieved June 27, 2014 from Wikimedia Web site: http://commons.wikimedia.org