Below is a list of upper-level courses to be offered Fall Semester 2019. Note that in addition to fulfilling requirements for the English Major, English Minor, and/or Writing Minor, some courses also count the GDST Minor, the Ethics/Religion and Society Flag in the Core Curriculum, Creative Perspectives in the Core Curriculum and/or the Diversity Flag in the Core Curriculum. Some courses also count for the Writing Flag in the Core Curriculum.

English majors and minors: See below for which courses fulfill which requirements. Click here for a list of all English courses by requirement

Writing minors: See below for which courses fulfill requirements for the Writing Minor.

Not a major or minor? All English courses except ENGL 101, 115, and 205 count for the Humanities Elective in the Core and all except ENGL 210 Methods Workshop and ENGL 499 Senior Seminar are open to everyone. Join us - non-majors are welcome!

ENGL 210-01 Methods Workshop
ENGL 221-01 Poetry
ENGL 302-01 Modern Literary Theory
ENGL 305-01 Professional Writing
ENGL 309-01/02 Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL 315-01 Composition Tutoring
ENGL 320-01 Topics in Linguistics
ENGL 321-01 History of the English Language
ENGL 339-01 Digital Writing
ENGL 348-01 Literature and the Environment
ENGL 364-01 Jane Austen: Then & Now
ENGL 370-01 Writings by Sexual Minorities
ENGL 425-01 Shakespeare
ENGL 468-01 Transatlantic Literature
ENGL 499-01 Senior Seminar

ENGL 210-01 Methods Workshop
94916 TR 10:00-11:15 Renzi
This is a course for English majors/minors only, designed to introduce these students to the disciplinary conventions of reading, discussing, researching and writing with English. Course will focus its units around reading literature, discussing literature, and writing researched arguments about literature.
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ENGL 221-01 Poetry
90709 TR 2:30-3:45 Renzi
Reading and understanding poetry has often been conceived of as "challenging" (to say the least!) - well, in this course, we will tackle this challenge head-on. You will learn to read poetry carefully and to analyze its words, poetic structures and forms, and linguistic nuances; it is also my hope that you will also come to enjoy poetry as a living, breathing, moving form of art that has intoxicated its readers and listeners for centuries. We will read individual poems throughout the canon of English- language poetry, we will also read full collection from several poets. Throughout, you will be asked to bring your analytical and emotional skills of interpretation to the table in working through this difficult language together.
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ENGL 302-01 Modern Literary Theory
93421 TR 1:00-2:15 Williams
This course introduces English majors to the history of the Western academy and the relationship between the development of the American university and the development of literary theory and criticism.
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ENGL 305-01 Professional Writing
92832 TR 11:30-12:45 Frey
This course offers extensive practice in professional writing, communication, and presentation. In the first part of the course, we will examine rhetorical choices—such as audience, purpose, and style—within a variety of genres, including professional emails, memos, cover letters, resumes, reports, and proposals. In the second part of the course, students will make inquires into the types of writing that may be used in their future professional and civic lives, and will work collaboratively to create and present projects for workplace or public audiences.
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ENGL 309-01/02 Creative Writing: Poetry
90713 TR 8:30-9:45 McCarty
95349 TR 10:00-11:15 McCarty
This course is intended for students who want to develop and expand their skills in writing poetry. Students will explore a range of poetic genres and immerse themselves in the reading and writing of poetry. Class sessions will be devoted to the discussion of poetry, creative invention and writing activities, and student presentations and readings. Other work for the course may include writing literary analysis and responses to required readings. We will begin the course by analyzing poetry with aesthetic awareness and appreciation. Students will be expected to develop familiarity with the specialized concepts and language related to both free and formal verse. Throughout the semester, students will work on drafting and revising a portfolio of poems that they will share and perform at the end of the semester.
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ENGL 315-01 Composition Tutoring
94250 MWF 1:00-1:50 Russell
Students in this course will study and gain experience in the theory and practice of one-on-one conferencing in writing, with a focus on the dynamics of the tutorial session, the writing process, rhetorical analysis, the study of error, the logic of grammar, revision, ESL issues, and writing in the disciplines.  Students put their study of writing into practice by apprenticing as tutors for an ENGL 101 course throughout the semester.  The materials and assignments for this upper-level writing course additionally challenge students to develop their own knowledge and craft of writing.  Required of students before they may tutor in the Writing Center, the course is by no means limited to English and Education majors/graduate students, for whom its benefits may be readily identified.  Composition Tutoring is a good elective for  students pursuing careers that demand facility and proficiency in written expression and the ability to work cooperatively with others.  Interested undergraduates should exhibit a commitment to writing and have earned a grade of B or better in ENGL 101 or ENGL 115.
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ENGL 320-01 Topics in Linguistics
90715 MWF 1:00-1:50 Winkelmann
Feminist Poststructuralist Discourse Analysis: This course introduces students to contemporary issues, theories, and methodologies in language studies and feminism. We will engage feminist linguistics, a field of study that searches for ways to identify, demystify, and finally defuse language practices that create and sustain gender inequality or discrimination, particularly against women and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer people. Poststructuralist analysis uncovers how different subject positions occur within the same text or even in the same speech event. It reveals linguistic mechanisms of social change as individuals negotiate communities of practice, institutions, and their own culture. FDPA is a textual approach well-suited for students interested in contemporary literatures, cultural studies, and classrooms.
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ENGL 321-01 History of the English Language
90716 MWF 12:00-12:50 Cline-Bailey
This course covers the development of the English language from its early status as a little-known Germanic dialect to its establishment as one of the world’s most influential international languages. Though emphasis will be placed on the sociolinguistic factors which affect the structure and use of the language, attention will also be given to syntactic, phonological, and lexico-semantic factors which continue to affect its development.
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ENGL 339-01 Digital Writing
95464 Online Gerding
In ENGL 339: Digital Writing, students will study a number of digital and web-based genres and produce their own thoughtful writing for public, online dissemination. While we will use and analyze a range of different technologies and design principles, this is not a technical skills course; instead, we will consider how existing and emergent technologies afford new techniques for persuasion, self-expression, and content creation. Throughout this course we will explore how online circulation both changes the ways in which we write and reinforces many of the age-old ideas about how to write effectively. We will also consider how writing technologies have developed over time and how this has, in turn, shaped the way we think, reason, communicate, and perceive the world around us. Blending the traditional strengths of the humanities—critical thinking, rhetorical analysis, and research that explores the human condition—with techniques enabled by digital technologies, the ultimate goals of this course are to analyze the influence technology has on writing, persuasion, and expression, and to produce thoughtful, well-reasoned, and effectively designed digital writing intended for public audiences.
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ENGL 348-01 Literature and the Environment
95465 MWF 2:00-2:50 Ottum
Wildfires.  Rising seas.  Species extinction.  Pollution.  The news about nature these days isn’t so good—in fact, it’s pretty terrible.  Climate change is progressing more or less unchecked, and extreme weather is becoming increasingly common.  Every time you turn around, something is on fire or under water.

What can art possibly do about any of this?  That’s one of the main questions posed by “literature and the environment” or “ecocriticism,” a subfield of literary studies.  Much as feminist literary criticism examines literature in relation to gender and power, ecocriticism examines the relationship between art and the natural world.  In simple terms, ecocritics read poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and other genres to discover 1) where our ideas about nature come from; 2) how our ideas about nature shape our interaction with it; and 3) how art might help us to describe or imagine a better future. 

You don’t have to be a tree-hugger to take ENGL 348. You don’t have to like camping, hiking, bugs, or even animals.  All you need is an interest in thinking critically and a willingness to tackle some tough readings.  A sense of humor is helpful, too.  We’ll use various genres of mostly contemporary literature to explore questions such as: what is “nature”—and how did it get to be separate from “culture”?  Should literature “speak for” other species?  How does art register climate change? and What happens when queer theory meets environmentalism?  This course counts as a Humanities elective and an elective for the English Major and Minor.  Questions about this course are welcome: contact Lisa Ottum: ottuml@xavier.edu
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ENGL 364-01 Jane Austen: Then & Now
95350 TR 1:00-2:15 Wyett
This course will explore the historical context and enduring popularity of the works of Jane Austen. We will discuss all of Austen’s six published novels, some of her juvenilia and letters, multiple film adaptations, a great deal of scholarly criticism, and some other recent adaptations of her work. We will focus on analysis of Austen’s work in relation to the social and cultural conditions of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain and its place in the development of the English novel, still a new genre at the time. But we will also consider its continued relevance to our lives. Thus we will examine not only the ways in which Austen’s work responds to and reflects the major social issues of her time (the Napoleonic wars, the abolition of the slave trade, gender inequity in property laws and customs, the human costs of maintaining the landed gentry, etc.), but also the ways in which modern adaptations either incorporate or, more often, ignore these themes by looking closely at how and why Austen’s work is adapted for modern audiences. This class serves as a British Literature elective for English majors and minors, a British Literature OR Women’s Literature course for secondary education Language Arts certification students, fulfills the university undergraduate Humanities Elective requirement, and serves as an elective for the Gender and Diversity Studies major/minor.  
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ENGL 370-01 Writings by Sexual Minorities
92325 MWF 11:00-11:50 Yandell
This course will focus on literature in three major categories: works by authors who are part of the lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender community, works that depict characters from the lgbt community, and works that have served as rallying cries for lgbt readers.  These categories often overlap, and their borders are typically not clearly marked (we retroactively assign homosexual identities to authors for whom the term might have been meaningless, for example).  Novels, plays, short stories, and films will be supplemented with articles on queer literary theory as well as a larger primer on Gay Studies.  Student writing will consist largely of literary criticism on the primary sources.
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ENGL 425-01 Shakespeare
90718 WF 3:00-4:15 O'Leary
This class introduces William Shakespeare’s works through the lens of performance studies. In addition to reading each of the major Shakespearean genres--poetry, tragedy, history, comedy, and romance—we will attend two performances at the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company and a staged reading on campus. Throughout the class, we will consider not only the historical context of the works and their critical heritage, but also what it means to encounter them in theatrical productions today. In addition to spirited participation in class discussion and a presentation, students will write in a variety of forms, including Twitter, wikis, performance reviews, creative work, and research-driven essays. All of the coursework is designed to strengthen students’ critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.
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ENGL 468-01 Transatlantic Literature
95466 TR 11:30-12:45 Renzi
Writing the Livable World

What makes for a livable world, both for the world’s citizens and for the environment they inhabit? How does the question of “livability” index other concerns about justice, human rights, and oppression/discrimination? And what role do authors have in envisioning, creating, and critiquing such livable worlds?

This course will take up these issues of livability as they arise within a series of American and British texts, from the late 19th century through the mid 20th century, in which authors have both critiqued their contemporary worlds and imagined/created alternatives. Some of these texts are canonical treatments of traditional realist or modernist nature (such as James’s Daisy Miller and West’s Return of the Soldier); others are more experimental (Eugene O’Neill’s plays) or engaged in the genres of fantasy/sci-fi (Burdekin’s Proud Man and Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness). It is my hope that by treating such generically disparate texts together, we can investigate the ways in which this concern of “livability,” and its attendant interest in social critique/commentary, proliferates in a wide and diverse array of turn-of-the-century transatlantic texts. Judith Butler writes in her 2004 book Undoing Gender that “what is most important is to cease legislating for all lives what is livable only for some, and similarly, to refrain from proscribing for all lives what is unlivable for some” (8). Throughout this course, I hope we can work together to think through the ways in which our authors—by positing the stories of those who are extraordinary, of those who are “other”—are testing the limitations of their current realities (as legislated AND as imagined), while at the same time seeking to create more holistically livable spaces for all lives—even the most minoritized or oppressed ones.

Course texts include: Chopin, The Awakening; James, Daisy Miller; O’Neill, Diff’rent; O’Neill, The Hairy Ape; Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness; Burdekin, Proud Man; West, The Return of the Soldier; Hughes, Montage of a Dream Deferred
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ENGL 499-01 Senior Seminar 
90722 TR 2:30-3:45 Finkelstein

Modern American Poetry: Competing Modernisms

The first half of the 20th century, especially the years from before World War I to World War II, witnessed unprecedented changes in literature, as well as in the other arts.  These changes, many of them as abrupt and violent as the times in which they occurred, can be seen perhaps more clearly in the genre of poetry than in any other. Our seminar will explore American poetry of this era, considering its formal and thematic transformations, as a chapter in the cultural narrative to which we now give the name modernism. Modernism in turn may be understood as part of an ongoing historical dialectic, as indicated by our inevitable recourse to terms like modernity and modernization as well.

Modernism, however, takes many forms, claims many histories, and seeks to accomplish a variety of cultural tasks: hence the idea, that will be fundamental to our study, of competing modernisms. We will consider a number of modernist visions, including occult or esoteric modernism, everyday or ordinary modernism, linguistic or formal modernism, and the modernisms of difference (modernisms of race, class, and gender). We will quickly see how these competing visions intersect and contribute, sometimes jarringly, to the work of individual poets and to individual poems. We will concentrate on the latter: rather than seek to comprehend the entire career of a few major figures, we will look mainly at specific poems which represent complex modernist formations and modes of poetic discourse.

Work for the seminar will include oral presentations, a reading journal, and most importantly, a fully developed research paper leading to a presentation to the department and English students at the end of the semester.


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