EOAs part of the Core Curriculum's Ethics / Religion and Society Requirement, Literature and the Moral Imagination is required for all undergraduate students. In broad terms, ENGL 205: Literature and the Moral Imagination focuses on personal and social ethical issues in literature. Individual sections feature specific topics.

*Some sections of ENGL 205 also fulfill the Diversity Curriculum Requirement (DCR) Flag and/or count for electives in Peace Studies, GDST, and/or other programs: See below for details.
Literature and the Moral Imagination: Spring 2019

ENGL 205-01 and 02 Focus on: Satire and Dystopia
ENGL 205-03 and 05 Focus on: The Anthropocene
ENGL 205-04H Focus on: Literary Detectives
ENGL 205-06 and 10 Focus on: Alternate Historical Fiction
ENGL 205-07 Focus on: Resisting, Reshaping, and Retelling
ENGL 205-08 and 09 Focus on: Journey to Hell and Back
ENGL 205-11 Focus on: Stranger Than Fiction
ENGL 205-12, 13 and 22 Focus on: The Immigrant's Experience
ENGL 205-14 and 16 Focus on: Gender and Violence
ENGL 205-15 and 17 Focus on: Love and Betrayal
ENGL 205-18 and 24A Focus on: Mental Illness
ENGL 205-19 and 21 Focus on: Prophets, Shamans, Wizards, and Magicians
ENGL 205-20 and 23 Focus on: I Need A Hero
ENGL 205-25 and 26 Focus on: Passing and Performing Identity


ENGL 205-01 and 02 Focus on: Satire and Dystopia
Section 01 MWF 8:00-8:50 WYETT
Section 02 MWF 9:00-9:50 WYETT
CRN 14458 and 11005
This course explores how authors use satire, a literary technique, and dystopia, a genre, to comment upon existing social problems or ills either by ridiculing them or projecting where unchecked abuses might lead us. We will begin with some satirical writing from the eighteenth century before focusing on modern works that consider how factors such as race, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, religion, age, and ability—and their intersections—shape power relations and threats to legal, civic, and human rights. Consequently, pending approval, this course will also serve as an elective for the Gender and Diversity Studies minor and fulfill the 3-credit hour Diversity Flag Requirement.
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ENGL 205-03 and 05 Focus on: The Anthropocene
Section 03 MWF 10:00-10:50 OTTUM
Section 05 MWF 11:00-11:50 OTTUM
CRN 11006 and 11008
According to scientists, historians, and cultural observers, we are living in the Anthropocene, a geological epoch caused by human activity.  While experts disagree about when exactly the Anthropocene started, it’s clear that we—people—have profoundly modified the atmosphere, ocean ecology, and even the ground beneath our feet.  We’ve changed the planet in ways that imperil our own long-term survival and thriving (not to mention that of countless other species).

 What does it mean to live in the Anthropocene?  How should we proceed as a society—and how should we cope, as individuals, with feelings of fear, guilt, and frustration?  This section of 205 focuses on the Anthropocene, using literature to examine the challenges we face as a “force of nature.”  We’ll read several novels, as well as some poetry; students will also undertake a substantial researched project.  Queries about this section of 205 are welcome: email Dr. Lisa Ottum at ottuml@xavier.edu.
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ENGL 205-04H Focus on: Literary Detectives
Section 04H MWF 11:00-11:50 HERREN
CRN 11007
This class focuses upon Literary Detectives. We will study innovative approaches to mystery novels, detective stories, haunted houses, and literary obsession.
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ENGL 205-06 and 10 Focus on: Alternate Historical Fiction
Section 06 MWF 12:00-12:50 STECKL
Section 10 MWF 2:00-2:50 STECKL 
CRN 11009 and 11013
This course uses alternate historical fiction--text and television in which one slight alteration in a historical event leads to a drastically different United States--to explore real and imagined American culture. Examining social power structures, interactions among minority and majority populations, and the implications of acting on self-interest, students will reflect, discuss, debate, collaborate, and critically analyze topics such as race relations, religious plurality, and immigration. 
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ENGL 205-07 Focus on: Resisting, Reshaping, and Retelling
Section 07 MWF 1:00-1:50 TODD
CRN 11010
This class covers how literary texts inherently reflect or interrogate ethical or moral action, and the various ways authors-and characters and readers-"read" the world around them and resist, reshape or retell what they see. How do authors/characters/readers deal with challenges to their beliefs? Or challenges to social norms, or competing values?
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ENGL 205-08 and 09 Focus on: Journey to Hell and Back
Section 08 MWF 1:00-1:50 LYON
Section 09 MWF 2:00-2:50 LYON 
CRN 11011 and 11012
We travel to the depths of Hell to assess our own moral compasses, to understand how we impose our moral compass on others, and to begin to forgive and find strength in ourselves along life's messy journey.
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ENGL 205-11 Focus on: Stranger Than Fiction
Section 11 W 4:15-6:45 ROZZI
CRN 11014
In this course, we will read literature in which real world events shape the stories authors tell. 
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ENGL 205-12, 13, and 22 Focus on: The Immigrant's Experience
Section 12 TR 8:30-9:45 CLINE-BAILEY
Section 13 TR 10:00-11:15 CLINE-BAILEY
Section 22 TR 2:30-3:45 CLINE-BAILEY
CRN 14460, 11016, and 14461
In this course we will analyze novels and short stories which portray the experiences of immigrants and the moral issues which arise from them.  
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ENGL 205-14 and 16 Focus on: Gender and Violence
Section 14 TR 10:00-11:15 WINKELMANN
Section 16 TR 11:30-12:45 WINKELMANN
CRN 11017 and 11019
This course takes an intersectional feminist approach to the study of the way language practices contribute to the proliferation of gendered violence against women, children, sexual minorities, and people of color.
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ENGL 205-15 and 17 Focus on: Love and Betrayal
Section 15 TR 10:00-11:15 RUSSELL
Section 17 TR 11:30-12:45 RUSSELL
CRN 11018 and 11020 

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ENGL 205-18 and 24A Focus on: Mental Illness
Section 18 TR 11:30-12:45 PRUES
Section 24A S 8:30-12:00 PRUES
CRN 11021 and 14082
In this course we will learn about and evaluate and how some aspects of "mental illness" manifest themselves in literature, life, and film. Ultimately, this course will challenge, clarify, and destigmatize our individual and societal presumptions and conclusions about "mental illness."
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ENGL 205-19 and 21 Focus on: Prophets, Shamans, Wizards, and Magic
Section 19 TR 1:00-2:15 FINKELSTEIN
Section 21 TR 2:30-3:45 FINKELSTEIN
CRN 11022 and 13329
Prophets, shamans, wizards and magicians are some of the most ancient archetypal characters in human culture, and maintain an enduring hold on the imagination. In this course, we will explore who and what they are, determine what roles they play in the realms of ethics and religion, and ask how best to understand the fascination of their mysterious being.
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ENGL 205-20 and 23 Focus on: I Need and Hero
Section 20 TR 1:00-2:15 HAMILTON
Section 23 TR 2:30-3:45 HAMILTON
CRN 13052 and 13365
If everyone is 'the hero' of his or her own story, despite having very different approaches to life, then why in literature are readers often able to easily identify the hero of the story? Alternatively, what does it suggest to readers about literature (and about life) when a text presents no clear hero, or that role in a text is disputed? Examining changes in literary portrayals of heroism over time also raises questions about how our own lived 'heroics' may be viewed by future generations. By studying texts from Classical to contemporary, we will refine our understanding of and engagement with the societal role of hero, in both private and public spheres.
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ENGL 205-25 and 26 Focus on: Passing and Performing Identity
Section 25 Online MCFARLANE HARRIS
Section 26 Online MCFARLANE HARRIS 
In this course, we will read fiction and graphic novels that investigate the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States, whereby “black” persons light-skinned enough to appear “white” cross the color line to live as white people. Along the way, we will read a smattering of historical sources and cultural theory on the social construction of race, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic class, religion, etc.
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