Xavier's Seal and Symbols

The Seal of Xavier University

The Xavier University seal has historical significance and is rooted in the Jesuit tradition. The seal symbolically represents the University's origin, values and spiritual foundation. The seal is used for official correspondence and documents and is primarily used by the office of the president.

At the center of the seal is a shield divided in half vertically. On the left, from the Xavier family coat of arms, is a pattern of vertical stripes. On the right side, a black-robed arm holding a crucifix extends, symbolizing St. Francis Xavier, a founding member of the Jesuit order. Below, three seashells symbolize St. Francis Xavier's three journeys to the Far East.

Surrounding the shield are inscriptions describing the University's heritage: above is the Jesuit seal, IHS, the first three letters of the Greek word for Jesus; below, the Jesuit motto, AMDG (Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam: in English, "To the Greater Glory of God").

On the ribbon beneath the shield is the motto, Vidit Mirabilia Magna ("He has seen great wonders"). In its full context, the motto affirms that the person who has ?inquired into righteousness has awakened to her admirable grandeur.? The outer rim of the seal bears the Latin inscription:

UNIVERSITAS XAVERIANA CINCINNATENIS

(1831, date of Xavier's founding)

 

The Xavier Shield

Created by Lipman Hearne of Chicago, the nation’s leading marketing and communications firm for the nonprofit sector, the logo represents the University as a whole. Xavier's athletic teams, however, will not be adopting the new image and logos but will continue using what they currently have.

The logo is a capital X layered over a shield with a cross and fleur-de-lis. The colors are dark blue, metallic silver and white. The shield reflects tradition, academic excellence, prestige and power. The cross and fleur-de-lis, a symbol with rich, religious history, reflects Xavier’s spiritual heritage and mission of service to others.

 

The Xavier Musketeer: All For One and One For All

In the spring of 1925, The Xaverian News sponsored a contest to find an
appropriate nickname for the athletic teams. Francis J. Finn, S.J. suggested
"Musketeers." Finn believed the "All for One and One for All" motto attached to the legendary characters should symbolize the spirit of the athletic teams.

 

The Blue Blob

In 1985, spirit squad coordinator Sally Watson designed the Blob when she realized that the Musketeer scared little children. And let’s be real, a man with a giant head and handlebar mustache wielding a sword is kind of scary, even for adults. The Blue Blob serves as a secondary mascot for the Xavier University athletic teams. The Blob is well known for being able to excite the crowd and is a favorite among the younger Musketeer fans.

 

The Xavier Mace

A mace is a custom-made piece of art and sometimes crafted from relics of the university. It can be decorated with gems and precious metals, sometimes in the official university colors. The Xavier University mace was designed and crafted by Bernard Schmidt, Professor Emeritus, of the department of art.

The mace symbolizes the legal and chartered authority of Xavier University. It is brought into the gathering immediately before the President. Historically, the mace was a war club. In the Middle Ages it was carried by a bodyguard to defend a person of authority. Today, its purpose is strictly ceremonial and carried by the Grand Marshal. During the ceremony the mace rests at the front of the stage in its holder.


Xavier University Alma Mater 

Xavier is our family tree, Rooted in one history.
Nurtured by our legacy, Xavier’s humble pedigree
Branches out to though the same God we call by many names,
And a glow in love a-flame, Bear the fruit of Xavier’s fame.

Fame that no one can impeach Growing to extend our reach,
Planting fertile seeds in each Soul and mind we serve and teach.
One community we stand Building dreams and hopes with hands
Stretching out across the land For each woman child and man.