Conway Faculty Fellow                                                                          

The Conway Fellowship is an initiative of the new Ruth J. and Robert A. Conway Institute for Jesuit Education. The Institute, within the Center for Mission and Identity, assists educators in transforming students intellectually, morally and spiritually in the Jesuit, Catholic tradition, while appropriating Ignatian pedagogy and spirituality in today's world.

For the Conway Fellowship Application and more information, click here.
 

2014

Dr. Gary Lewandowski, professor in the department of Mathematics & Computer Science was awarded the Fellowship for his project, "Critical Making"; the abstract follows: 

This project provides time and resources to implement a new academic program, Critical Making. The program reimagines Jesuit liberal arts education as a tightly integrated combination of community, creation, and critical analysis.  Centering on disruptive technologies, in particular personal fabrication (e.g. 3D-printing, CNC tools) and computation (e.g. mobile applications, data science), the program emphasizes the process of creating physical and software artifacts for and with a community (e.g. the university, local neighborhoods, the city, state, country and world). This process is embedded in the liberal arts by intentional analysis and reflection in the science, mathematics, business, philosophy, history, art, and theology courses taken by the students. The combination of community, creation, and critical thinking encourages Ignatian values of service, discernment, and reflection.  This fellowship will provide time to develop the program. The project deliverables include a curriculum proposal for an undergraduate degree and a first course offering in Spring 2015.

 

2013

Dr. Julia . O'Hara, Associate Professor, History Department, was awarded the 2013 Fellowship for her project, "Toward an 'Educated Solidarity' with Central America: Constructing a Jesuit Resource on Central American History for Service and Community-Engage Learning." She describes it in this way:

The project that I propose is to compile, edit, and author a new Jesuit Resource for the study of Central American history that is informed by both Ignatian pedagogy and the historical literature, and is customized for use by participants in community-engaged service experiences in Central America. Using as a model the "online seminars" on the website www.jesuitresource.org, this project will create concrete learning materials to support experiential learning, reflection, and intercultural understanding, and to help users gain self-awareness about their roles in the complex interactions that take place during cross-cultural encounters. Co-curricular service experiences such as Alternative Breaks and "mission trips" to Central American countries have a great capacity to help students bring new perspectives to their classroom work. By providing a rich and diverse set of learning materials about Central American history, the proposed project will provide a framework in which personal engagement and critical thinking can reinforce each other. This process is essential to our efforts to inculcate in our students not simply compassion for, but an "educated solidarity" with, the people of other nations.

2012

Elaine Crable, Ph.D., Professor of Management Information Systems was awarded the 2012 Fellowship for her project, "A Mission Driven Effort to Incorporate Web Accessibility into Xavier's Online Course Initiative."  She describers her project in this way:

As we begin our move into delivering courses and programs virtually, we need to remember our Ignatian mission of inclusion. Providing online access to Xavier courses will benefit people who find coming to campus a hardship. This hardship might stem from family and/or job obligations; time/location constraints; or, a physical disability.

This proposal focuses on developing an acute awareness of the importance of accessibility as we design and develop online curricula. The internet has opened up wonderful possibilities for communication and convenience, but for those with sight or hearing impairments it can be very frustrating when the web content is not accessible. Accessibility to our online course components is not only a legal issue it is also our mission as a Jesuit institution. During this fellowship I would work with Information Resources, Discovery Services, the Learning Assistance Center and Mission and Identity to produce documents for Policies and Guidelines for Online Web Accessibility and produce research publications about the topic of accessibility in education.

To see Dr. Crable's Online Learning Resources for Universal Accessibility project, click here.
See her work in the Spring 2013 edition of the AJCU's Connections e-newsletter:
   A Mission-driven Effort to Incorporate Web Accessibility into On-line Courses
 

2011

Dr. Michael Goldweber, Professor of Mathematics/Computer Science, was awarded the 2011 Fellowship for his project, "A Service Learning Experience in Computing". He describes his project in this way:
    
The goal of this proposed fellowship is to develop an overseas service learning semester in computing.     The service learning semester would strive to focus students to consider the following fundamental question: "Instead of using computers to make money or do basic scientific research, how can one use computing to do good in the world"? Since computing students rarely study abroad, let alone undertake a service learning semester, developing a service learning experience in computing fills a very acute need. The goal would be to partner with other Jesuit universities to create a biennial experience that would draw computing students from any of the partner institutions who together will undertake a service project where computing can play a significant contributing role.

2010

Dr. Jennifer Beste, Associate Professor of Theology at Xavier University, was awarded the 2010 Conway Fellowship for her project, Seeking Sexual Justice on a Jesuit Campus. This project originated during her participation in the 2004 Ignatian Mentoring Program for Faculty. She has continued to develop this important endeavor and the Fellowship will allow her to fully actualize her vision. Read a description about her project here and student feedback here.

An 18-minute video, "Ignatian Spirituality and Sexuality", is here. The video is a pedagogical resource for educators working to impact the "hook-up culture".

A brief video describing Jennifer Beste's project can be found here.

Dr. Beste's project was showcased in the February 2011 edition of the Connections e-newsletter for the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities.