LEADERSHIP CORE

LEAD 880 – Comparative Leadership Theory

This doctoral seminar provides a context for the scholarly and practical analysis, critique and synthesis of foundational theories of leadership, including classical, neo-classical, contemporary and emergent perspectives. Guided by an understanding of the principles of theory construction, the fundamental tenets of each theory are considered in relation to stated propositions, accrued evidence, organizational utility, and unanswered questions. Throughout the course, comparative analysis and critique of leadership theory is fostered with respect to the perennial questions informing research, scholarship and practice in the field of leadership studies. The outcomes of the course are focused on promoting an understanding of the multifaceted nature of leadership; the limitations of adopting a single theoretical perspective, an appreciation for the roles and functions framing leadership: individuals, groups, processes, contexts & relationships; the synergistic framework shaping leadership emergence & practice; the fallacy of leader-centric perspectives, and the importance of developing theoretical fluidity as scholars and practitioners.

LEAD 881 - Leading Organizational Culture & Change

This course focuses on the role of leaders in understanding and managing the reciprocal processes of organizational culture and change. Normative and ethnographic approaches to analyzing organizational culture are introduced as core competencies for affecting change. Classical content and process theories of change are explored with respect to individual, social and anthropological implications. Cultural dynamics and processes of acculturation in organizations are examined in the context of evolutionary, teleological, life cycle, political and social cognitive perspectives on leading change. A model of organizational change in cultural context is introduced, along with research tools and strategies for assessing the extent to which leaders influence cultural dynamics and change processes in organizations.

LEAD 882 - Psychosocial Dimensions of Leadership

This doctoral course introduces and explores significant psychological and social constructs that mediate or moderate leadership behavior and effectiveness. Theories of motivation, personality, identity, self-concept, cognition, emotion, psychosocial development, and the dimensions of values, character and spirituality are explored, as they relate to the complex mechanisms that underlie leader and follower behavior. Interdisciplinary research illustrating the pervasive role and function of psychosocial dimensions in the construction and understanding of leadership dynamics in organizations and communities provides a context for developing more nuanced approaches to advancing leadership theory and practice.

LEAD 883 – Ethical, Spiritual & Character-based Leadership

This integrative leadership seminar explores ethical, spiritual and character-based theories of leadership. Traditional justifications underlying leader’s deviation from ethical norms of behavior are interpreted through multiple philosophical lenses rooted in the moral psychology of leadership. Individual character strengths and virtues are explicated, as well as character flaws and the processes of self-deception that lead to leadership failure and leader derailment. Practical strategies are assessing and developing character strengths and overcoming character flaws rooted in unconscious dynamics of self-deception provide a framework for overcoming habitual patterns of destructive leader behavior and building leadership capacity in individuals, organizations and communities. Theoretical perspectives on spiritual leadership are examined though the lens of multiple religious traditions, stewardship, self-sacrifice and socially responsibility. Jesuit values and spiritual exercises are explored with respect to their alignment (or misalignment) with various leadership theories. Consideration is given to the extent to which leadership practice itself represents set of disciplines that promote higher forms of consciousness and stewardship in organizations and societies.

LEAD 884 - Developing Leadership Capacity in Individuals, Organizations & Communities

This capstone course in the doctoral Leadership Core integrates knowledge of leadership theory and practice through a systematic exploration of techniques for assessing and developing leadership capacity in individuals, groups, organizations and communities. Students will master state-of-the-art strategies for developing integrated leadership development programs targeting identified populations based on diagnostic assessment and interpretation of existing leadership capacities. Theories of adult development and comparative models of leadership development provide a foundation for introducing an array of effective strategies proven to enhance leadership potential. Research on the efficacy of alternative intervention strategies guides the selection and application of leadership theories for purposes of assessment, interpretation and construction of targeted developmental plans.

RESEARCH CORE

LEAD 870 - Fundamentals of Research Design in Leadership Studies

Providing an introduction to the fundamentals of social and behavioral research, this course provides a conceptual framework for doctoral students in Organizational Learning and Leadership to understand the conceptual foundations underlying effective research design. Students will begin to understand how research methods are predicated upon the theoretical frameworks and research questions or hypotheses derived from a comprehensive review pertinent literature in relevant disciplines. Students will learn how to evaluate existing research using a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. As a result of developing a greater understanding of research methods, students will demonstrate the ability to critique the efficacy of research methods used in a various types of published research.

LEAD 871 - Doctoral Statistics I

This course is intended for doctoral students who require a working knowledge of statistical methods used in behavioral and social science research. The course covers (1) measurement scales, (2) frequency tables and graphs, (3) measures of central tendency and variability, (4) transformed scores, (5) normal distributions, (6) sampling distributions, (7) hypothesis testing, (8) z test, t test, and ANOVA-F test, (9) chi square and other nonparametric statistics, (10) correlation and regression. Emphasis is on the conceptual understanding of statistics within the context of research and the interpretation of statistical results. Calculators are required.

LEAD 872 - Qualitative & Quantitative Research Methods in Leadership  

Providing a detailed examination of social science research methods applied to the study of organizational learning and leadership, this course focuses on the conceptual dimensions and pragmatic issues involved in designing and justifying defensible research proposals. Introducing a broad range of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies the course emphasizes decision points and selection criteria to be considered in making effective choices regarding dimensions of investigator control, types of empirical design, means of data collection, population selection, and modes of information extraction during analysis and interpretation of results. Course work is designed to enhance students’ mastery of and appreciation for the full range of social and behavioral research paradigms. A combination of active learning and peer facilitation helps prepare students to assume responsibility for becoming independent researchers capable of selecting, defending and implementing solid dissertation proposals.

LEAD 873 - Doctoral Statistics II

This course is intended for doctoral students who require a working knowledge of advanced statistical methods used in behavioral and social science research. The course covers (1) multivariate analysis of variance, (2) multiple regression, (3) exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, (4) structural equation modeling, (5) path analysis, (6) cluster analysis, and (7) meta-analysis. Strategies for computing power and estimating sample sizes will be covered. Emphasis is on the mastering the operation intricacies of data transformation, computation and interpretation of results. Required conceptual understanding of statistics within the context of research and the interpretation of statistical results. Calculators are required.

LEAD 874 - Develop Effective Research Proposals in Leadership

This course covers the social, technical, institutional and ethical dimensions of developing and defending doctoral-level research proposals. Understanding the structural elements of proposal writing will be emphasized, as well as considerations pertaining to the organization and presentation of ideas, issues relating to motivation and writing, organizing literature reviews, and developing a theoretical framework. The importance of articulating explicit plans for conducting data analysis, protecting human subjects, preserving data integrity, and preparing for an oral defense of design decisions will be stressed. In addition, students will create a plan for dealing effectively with the personal challenges of completing the dissertation phase of their program, including issues of time management, balancing competing priorities, overcoming writing blocks, developing discipline, and maintaining commitment to a goal. Doctoral candidates often face competing demands, negative environmental cues, social or institutional detractors, and internalized messages that foster a fear of success, the threat of failure, and the unknown consequences of achieving a life intension. This course provides practical strategies for navigating these common impediments to translating academic aspirations into reality.

COGNATE COURSE OPTIONS (Selected)

LEAD 860 - Organizational Metaphors & Contexts

This course provides an interdisciplinary social sciences perspective on the nature of organizing in modern society and the variety of organizational forms that provide contexts in which leadership matters. Students will consider the structural forms and underlying purposes served by organizations in multiple sectors of society, including corporate, non-profit, health care and educational domains. Differences and similarities among types of organizations will be considered through a variety of metaphorical lens that facilitate our understanding and interpreting the systemic, organismic, cultural and political dynamics that govern the societal contributions and ends serves by different types of organizations. Consideration will be given to both the functional and dysfunctional dynamics that shape and sometimes limit the range of proactive human behavior fostered by alternative forms of organizing. Strategies for improving the health and performance of 21 ”century organizations experiencing challenges in the face of trends in population, economy, health care, and environmental stewardship.

LEAD 861 – Organizational Communication Processes

This cognate course provides an overview of challenges and best practices respecting a range of issues pertaining to organizational communication. Normative processes governing the use and abuse of information and power are explored within the structural and normative contexts of different types of organizations. The dynamics of social relations, networking and team work provide a backdrop for understanding specific problems of organizational communication relating to identity, participation, conflict and its resolution. Special problems relating to global and cross-cultural communication are covered as well as the unique challenges of communicating organizational ethics and values. Assigned coursework lays the groundwork for conducting effective analyses of communication processes in a variety of organizational and community contexts.

LEAD 862 – Theory & Applications of Adult Development and Learning

This doctoral course introduces and explores significant theories and factors affecting adult development and learning that affect leadership and organizational effectiveness.  The course provides a broad survey of social science theories on adult development and learning including: a) the reciprocal relationship between development and learning in adulthood; b) the underlying role of self in adult development and learning; c) higher-order manifestations of adult development and learning; d) contextual moderators or adult development and learning; e) assessment and applications.  Students are afforded opportunities to integrate dimensions of adult development and learning with the application of theories of leadership within the context of a targeted organizational context. Assigned coursework lays the groundwork for engaging in successful leadership practice in a variety of organizational and community contexts.

LEAD 866 – Leadership Internship I

As the first of two internship courses in the Leadership Studies doctoral program, this course is designed to guide students through the process of negotiating the terms of their internship experience with a sponsor organization that conforms to established programmatic criteria and aligns with the student’s career objectives. Once the internship has been established, the course provides a structure and context for reporting and monitoring the first half of the student’s internship experience. Students are responsible for selecting a sponsor organization in conjunction with the course instructor, contacting and meeting with representatives of the sponsor organization to negotiate terms of their placement, in accordance with published program requirements, including the identification of a set of project-based responsibilities, leading to specified deliverables. Leadership objectives, responsibilities and outcomes, as well as hours to be committed by the intern, must all be approved by both the instructor and the program director before any internship activities commence. Progress and outcomes will be recorded and monitored throughout by means of an internship portfolio.

LEAD 867 - Leadership Internship II

As the second of two internship courses in the Leadership Studies doctoral program, this course is designed to continue monitoring students engaged in a negotiated internship experience with a sponsor organization that conforms to established programmatic criteria and aligns with the student’s career objectives. The course provides a structure and context for reporting and monitoring the progress and outcomes of the second half of the student’s internship experience. Students are responsible for completing their negotiated project-based responsibilities and producing the specified deliverables to their sponsor organization by established deadlines. Leadership objectives, responsibilities and outcomes, as well as hours to be committed by the intern, must all be fulfilled by completion of the course. Progress and outcomes will be recorded and monitored throughout by means of an internship portfolio. A the conclusion of the course, fulfillment of the terms of the internship will be documented and evaluated on the basis of a final report and presentation of learning outcomes, illustrating leadership concepts applied during the completion of project-based responsibilities.

LEAD 869 – Cognate Capstone Leadership Seminar

Drawing upon the various strands of theory, research and professional expertise introduced in the Leadership Core, as well as the practical knowledge emphasized in the Specialized Application Cognate, this capstone course affords students the opportunity to integrate multiple aspects of theory and practice.  Opportunities are provided to apply this integrated knowledge to concrete, enduring and emerging challenges affecting leaders in specific type of organization.  Issues related to serving distinct sectors of the community, adapting leadership expertise to targeted organizational contexts, addressing ethical dilemmas unique to each cognate domain, and identifying strategies for sustaining continued professional development and are some of the areas that will be featured. The focus will be on building practical knowledge, developing self-insight and constructing individualized schemas pertaining to the practice of leadership in specialized organizations.  Emphasis will be placed on trends and best practices as well as self-development and efficacy.

For more information contact:

Dr. Gail F. Latta, Ph.D.,
Director & Associate Professor
Leadership Studies Doctoral Program
College of Professional Sciences
Xavier University
lattag@xavier.edu
(513) 745-2986