Keynote Address and Workshop with Ken Bain

   

    Ken Bain

 

Keynote Address: 

"Deep Learning"

Monday, September 15th
3:00-4:45 pm

Kennedy Auditorium

(Conaton Learning Commons, room 412)

Reception to follow

Research on college students finds that many of them never learn deeply simply because they never intend to do so.  They intend to pass the course (surface learner) or simply make the highest grade (strategic learner), but few of them will predominantly intend to understand deeply and apply that understanding (deep learner).


Follow-Up Workshop: "Fostering Deep Learning and Creating a Natural Critical Learning Environment"
Tuesday, September 16th, 10:00-12:45 pm, CLC Room 308

REGISTER BELOW

Part A:  Fostering Deep Learning

In this highly interactive workshop, participants will explore what it means to learn deeply and how best to foster both deep intentions and deep results in learning. The participants will explore the findings of a fifteen year study of teachers who have been highly successful in fostering deep learning, and identify practical strategies for implementing deep learning in their own courses.  

Part B: Creating a Natural Critical Learning Environment

In this highly interactive workshop, the participants will explore Natural Critical Learning Environments, teaching practices that take into account how people tend to learn most effectively (for example, when they are trying to solve problems, when they feel a sense of control over their own education, or when they try, fail and receive feedback before being graded).

A free copy of What the Best College Teachers Do will be given to the first 10 faculty members to register for the Tuesday workshop

 


More about Ken Bain:

Ken Bain spent much of his academic career at Vanderbilt, Northwestern, and NYU, before becoming Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Professor of History and Urban Education (National Center for Urban Education), University of the District of Columbia, a post he left in July 2013. He was the founding director of four major teaching and learning centers: the Center for Teaching Excellence at New York University, the Searle Center for Teaching Excellence at Northwestern University, the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University, and the Research Academy for University Learning at Montclair University. His now classic book, What the Best College Teachers Do (Harvard University Press, 2004), won the 2004 Virginia and Warren Stone Prize for an outstanding book on education and society, and has been one of the top selling books on higher education.