1. Conduct presentations for women and racially or ethnically underrepresented student organizations that improve their skills with career and professional development.   (learn more)
     
  2. Coordinate diversity focused lunches and dinners where students can gather information about the organization as well as find out how the organization increases or promotes diversity within. (learn more)
     
  3. Build partnerships with student groups that are geared toward the populations in which
    you would like to recruit.
      (learn more)
     
  4. Conduct target marketing efforts to these populations for general information sessions and positions.
    (learn more)
     
  5. Identify various people and offices that work with the populations with which you would like to build relationships. (learn more)
     
  6. Develop programs and scholarship partnerships geared toward the students you would like to attract.
    (learn more)
     
  7. Have realistic expectations and calculated efforts. (learn more)
     
  8. Work with the persons within your organization to ensure that the efforts you are promoting are validated and sustained once you recruit the student. (learn more)

To increase diversity recruiting, it will need to be an on-going, long-term effort. The best marketing and promotion
comes from other students. In order for these students to support you, even when you are not on campus, your organization will need to build a strong positive relationship with them.

 
*adapted from the University of Notre Dame, Composed July 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conduct presentations for women and racially or ethnically underrepresented student organizations
that improve their skills with career and professional development.  This begins to "soft sell" your organization
and your commitment to the students' career growth. The students will bond to the organization because of your
service, which may prove to be more beneficial for long term connections than just promotion of positions. We
suggest you begin with opening presentations up to students other than the ones you are targeting for your full time
or internship positions, i.e. First year and sophomore level students. The goal is to not only recruit for the present,
but build relations for the future.
 
Coordinate diversity focused lunches and dinners where students can gather information about the
organization as well as find out how the organization
increases or promotes diversity within.
These work best when it is an "open forum" where the students feel comfortable asking "anything"
about the organization. This allows for trust and comfort to be developed, thus promoting the organization's
commitment to the students' interest.
 
Build partnerships with student groups that are geared toward the populations in which you
would like to recruit. 
Even if the group or event you are sponsoring is not ?career related?, the goal is
to connect with students. If a positive relationship is established, they will seek you out.  Partnerships
such as mentor programs, organization tours or days, and shadowing/information gathering initiatives with
persons within the organization are great for building rapport.
 
Conduct target marketing efforts to these populations for general information sessions and positions.
For those organizations that may be on limited budgets and cannot have separate presentations geared toward the
diverse populations on campus, this initiative may be a good alternative. The creation of separate targeted flyers or
e-mails to be sent to these populations advertising your general session is recommended.  The key is to ensure that
there are individuals present who can speak about current or future diversity initiatives. We recommend that you
mention these initiatives during your general session even if you are not sure if any ethnically or racially diverse
students are present. Also keep in mind you may have students with "hidden diversity" such as disabilities and
sexual orientation. This promotes your organization as being serious about diversity in general, not just when the
event is diversity focused. Make the most of your time on campus by attempting to coordinate schedules with
student club meeting times.
 
Id entify various people and offices that work with the populations with which you would like to build
relationships. 
Do not rely on just one source to identify these students. Various students gravitate toward different
areas for information and support. Ensuring you have hit numerous avenues will allow for better marketing.
 
Develop programs and scholarship partnerships geared toward the students you would like to attract.
Diversity publications such as Black Issues in Higher Education and Black Collegiate have conducted surveys to
gauge initiatives students felt would motivate them towards a particular company. The establishment of scholarships, internships, and mentorship programs through the company were ranked high on the surveys. Creating partnerships
with offices and student groups via mentorship and scholarships serve as a great way to establish rapport and a
pipeline to your organization.
 
Have realistic expectations and calculated efforts.  Xavier University has a small ethnically/racially diverse
population, so valuing quality over quantity is a necessity. Planning visits in which you can maximize your time is
the goal. Organizing efforts well in advance allows for all the avenues to be utilized promoting your program, event, or
position for maximum return.
 
Work with the persons within your organization to ensure that the efforts you are promoting are validated
and sustained once you recruit the student. 
The best way to lose the student connection is for one or two
students to have an unfavorable experience. All students share their experiences, but it is even more prevalent
with the small populations of ethnically/racially diverse students. All it takes is one experience!

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