Founder of world's first high school for AIDS orphans speaking at Bellarmine Chapel

Terry Charlton, S.J., founded St. Aloysius Gonzaga High School in 2003 on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya, where 1.7 million people live with AIDS and HIV | March 20, 2007

Terry Charlton, S.J., co-founder of St. Aloysius Gonzaga High School—the world’s first high school for AIDS orphans—is visiting Bellarmine Chapel on Sunday, March 25. Charlton is speaking briefly at the 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Masses. He is available for conversation and to show a 10-minute video, "A School in Nairobi, Kenya," between the 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. liturgies. These events are free and open to the public.

Located in the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya, St. Aloysius Gonzaga provides a Jesuit-model college preparatory education and support for youth who have lost their parents to AIDS. The high school offers hope and opportunity to students eager to rise above their dire circumstances and make a difference in the world.

Charlton, from the Chicago Province of Jesuits, founded St. Aloysius Gonzaga High School in December 2003 on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya, where 1.7 million people live with AIDS and HIV.

On top of a rigorous course load, students attend classes six days a week for 10 months per year. The school provides students with uniforms and books for free and feeds them breakfast six days a week and lunch five. The school presently serves 196 students and will produce its first graduates this coming November.